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oh no Mr Bill......

Accidental Woodworker - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 1:03am
A blast from past Saturday Night Live days. I had a Mr Bill moment tonight in the shop. I was snapping my last pic before shutting out the lights and I noticed a boo boo. I don't know how many pics I thought I had snapped but it made no never mind. I didn't have a SD card in the camera. I saw it on the last pic because I actually read what was on the LCD screen. It said no camera card installed. The first thought I had that echoed in the brain bucket was, "what idiot forgot to not only put in the card but didn't notice it sooner"?  Ah, that idiot would be me because I can't blame my wife or the cats for it.

Some pics I could snap again like the very last one. The others I didn't try to stage again. So I took a few to show the what I had done. But it was a short night in the shop so I'm sure the pic count would not have been too high anyways.


the after pic
 I sanded the interior and cleaned it with Orange Clean. I wanted to use Simple Green but I couldn't find the bottle. Then I remember my wife had taken it. I wanted to clean the inside of grease, dirt, etc before I applied the stripper. The stripper worked from the frog seat aft rather well. Forward of the frog seat, not so good. What little japanning that was left there didn't all come off.


this actually looks better
I used the spray stuff tonight for round one. Tomorrow night I will use the paste stuff on the left. The plane collector uses this and he lets it sit for 15 minutes before rinsing it off. I don't have a sand blaster like him so I'll be trying another round of stripper. After round #2 I'll see what I can do with a wire wheel in a drill.

from NH plane parts
I found this after my first 3 hunts came up dry. I snagged this set as soon as I saw it. I didn't even look at the price until I checked out. Almost no rust, dirt, or grunge on either piece. And the iron has a whole lot of life left to it. This will be going in Miles's #6.


why I bought it
This was the iron in Miles's #6 plane. I am going to hang onto the iron and see if I ever get anywhere near to it's use. I now have an extra chip breaker that I don't have to buy. I need one for a bare iron out of a 4 1/2. This chipbreaker is the first one I have bought that had the front forward end stoned so that it lays absolutely flat on the iron.



plumb bob for the 'A' thing - still no proper name for it

plumb bob for the Plumb line stick
Now I have to buy some twine or cotton cord. All I have is some fish line and I don't want to use that if I don't have to.

it is the center

I drew a line from the bottom angle by my finger, to the apex of the top one. It went almost dead nuts through the diagonals I drew yesterday. I am going to put the hole for the plumb bob string about a 1/2" above the center point.

prepped the plumb line stick
I checked for twist on the flat face I did yesterday and found none. I checked the opposite face and it had a teeny bit that I planed out. I then squared both edges, sawed and squared up the two offsets, and laid out where the dados will go. I'll chop them out tomorrow and glue them in place.

here is the pic of the outside edge Frank
This is the 15" square I just bought. It definitely isn't square but it also isn't a large round over neither. The question that is bugging me now, is why is it rounded and not square?

maybe it is for this????
The only thing I came up with this is that it helps somehow with checking for an outside square reading. With the roundish edge it will be easier to set it down this way and position it.


portable square till
My lunchtime doodling. I am thinking of making a portable till/box to keep the squares in. Having this will free up a lot of real estate in the tills in the toolbox. If I don't do that, I may have to make a bigger tool box. I bought what looks to be a 12 inch copy of the 15" square.  I think I can get all of the squares in this. The drawing doesn't show the 12 and 6 inch combo squares.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was the first black actor to win an Emmy as a lead actor in a comedy series?
answer - Robert Guillaume for Benson in 1985   (he passed away last week)

Domino dilemmas

Heartwood: Woodworking by Rob Porcaro - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 8:59pm
Domino joints
The Domino sure makes joinery easy: fast layout, cutting parts directly to length, mortises in a flash, no fussy trimming of tenon shoulders, and no trips to the sharpening bench. This may come at a price, however, if you fall into the seductive trap of machine woodworking, which is letting the limitations of the machine […] 0
Categories: Hand Tools

We’ll see Summer come again…

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 6:03pm

the title is for Michael Rogen, just to let him know I’m thinking of him. I like that summer’s gone. Fall is a beautiful time of year here. I am especially enjoying seeing how the light in the shop changes now. Today the light caught my eye a number of times. If I’m not careful, I’ll take as many photos as Rick McKee https://www.instagram.com/medullary_rick/ 

I used some auger bits this past weekend, and again today. I had the box of them out on the bench…

I’ve started the next project recently, and two carvings for it were standing up out of the way…

Today I got to work some in the shop, after teaching for 7 days straight (a student here for a week, and Plymouth CRAFT for the weekend). Time to finish off some stuff, first up is the wainscot chair. For this seat, I do use a template, in this case to map out the square mortises chopped in the seat board so it slips over the stiles. Here’s the seat board with its template off to the left. Complete with dust in the sunlight..

I’ve done lots of these, but it’s always worth it to go slowly – you have to get the holes just right, or they have gaps, or worse, the seat splits at the very narrow area beside the stile. Once I’m satisfied with the template’s fit, I scribe the locations of the mortises on the seat. That short grain right between the upper right hand corner of this mortise and the end grain is the fragile part. I’ve split them there, and seen them split on old ones.

Then I bore around the perimeter of the mortise with an auger bit.

Then chop with the chisel to bring the mortise to the proper shape. I scored the lines with a knife and/or awl. Very careful work with the chisel.

Once I have the mortise squared off, I bevel underneath, paring the walls of the mortise so it’s undercut. I only want the mortise tight on the stiles right at the top where it shows. I’ve never checked the underside of this joint on a period chair – but I like the idea of under-cutting it & beveling it. It relieves any un-necessary pressure there.

Then slip the seat down to test it.

Then I do the molding around the front and sides. Sides (end grain) first. A rabbet plane followed by a smooth plane. In this case, a moving filletster and the LN low angle jack plane.

I scored the line ahead of the filletster so I got a clean shoulder to this rabbet. The nicker on that plane is defunct. Then I used this Lie-Nielsen plane to round over the corner of the rabbet to create the thumbnail molding.

I work the front edge after the two ends, to clean up any tear-out. This seat is a nice clear radially-riven oak, two boards edge-glued together. Works great.

Then for good measure, I threw the arms in place, so I could test it out. The seat will be pegged into the three rails; square pegs in round holes.

These chairs are smaller than they look. They’re so imposing because of all the decoration, the bulk of the parts – but they’re really pretty snug chairs.

Here’s the important view – looks pretty tight around the stiles. Whew.

If you made it this far, thanks. 15 pictures – for me that’s over 2 weeks of Instagram. I like IG, but the blog is my favorite way to show what I’m up to…more detail, more depth. More work – but it’s fun. thanks for keeping up with me…


To Quote My Old Man, "Boy, What the Hell Were You Thinking"...

The Part-Time Woodworker - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 1:35pm
To say I'm surprised by the lack of comments regarding my experiment with Bondo and veneer would be an understatement. In fact, I have been mildly shocked by the lack of comments raking me over the coals for doing something that isn't considered a normal way to do things. The only thing I can think of that would keep the, "you-can't-do-it-that-way" boys from ripping me a new one is that they think I'm beyond help.

So what the hell was I thinking...

  Why Construction Grade ply?
This is mainly to do with price, but also to do with convenience. 
One sheet of 11mm Good One Side Fir Sanded Plywood at Lowe's or Home Depot is less than $50 a sheet. Included in that price is up to five cuts to the sheet, so getting the stock into the trunk of my wife's Fusion to take home was never a problem. 
  Why two layers of 11mm fir ply?
I wanted the material thickness to be in the same scale as the cabinet it defines. This is a fair-sized cabinet so its components should reflect that. I didn't need a full 1" thick. All I needed was material that was obviously thicker than 3/4", hence the laminated 11mm ply, which, when veneered on both sides, ends up being a very thin hair thinner than 1".
By laminating two 11mm pieces I could ensure they were dead flat during glue-up and they would stay that way after they came out of the clamps (ok, when the screws were removed - don't be so picky).
  Why not use pre-veneered ply?
I wanted White Oak veneer, not Red. The box stores only sell Red Oak Veneered ply, so I would have to purchase what I needed at a hardwood lumber yard, rent a truck to get it home, and fight with it to cut it up as I do not own a panel saw.
Price!  
Also, I have never done any veneering before and I wanted to try it. 
  Why veneer before assembly? 
Every component included in this cabinet is flat-slabbed. There isn't a curved surface on it. Believe me, I tried to add a curve or two, but when I did, I lost a lot of storage room where the corners once were. Because it is just flat panels, I guessed that fitting the veneer would be far easier if I had to trim 1" thick stock than it would be if I had to deal with stock that was 0.8mm thick.
  Why use Bondo? 
You can't be a car-guy who grew up in the '50s and '60s and not know about Bondo. 3M makes Bondo, and they also make a slightly heavier two-part filler called White Lightnin'. They recommend both for metal and wood, but I have found that the Bondo is quicker to work with for lighter applications, such as fairing my plywood slabs.
Peace,

Mitchell
Categories: Hand Tools

Scary Box for Halloween!

David Barron Furniture - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 11:24am

Anny sent me these pictures of some boxes she made with wood rescued from the firewood pile.
The lid on that big on is spooky!!



Categories: Hand Tools

In Stock: Limited Edition LAP Hats

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 7:48am

marriage_mark_hat_IMG_1070

You can now purchase our limited edition “marriage mark” hats in the online store. The hats are $27, and that price includes shipping in the United States (sorry these hats are not available to international customers).

You can purchase your hat via this link. You might want to hurry as there are only 100 available.

These are hats were embroidered and stamped by Texas Heritage Woodworks, so the work is crisp and perfect. These hats are made in China by Adams. But they are the best hat we could find before getting into the $100 baseball cap territory.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

New Site for Vision

Paul Sellers - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 7:33am

And a site it was just one year ago. Looking through a wired-off rectangle of waste land covered with old rubble from former construction work, I wondered to myself, “Could this ugly land be home to the work we want to progress quickly into the future?” Progress comes at a price and one part of the […]

Read the full post New Site for Vision on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

A Stay-set # 3 Record Bench Plane

Paul Sellers - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 2:42am

It’s quite a lovely plane really. Compact and lightweight, feisty in the hand and then dead gutsy. That’s howI feel about all of the #3s really. I love plucking them from my tools from time to time and seeing them flip, turn and twist to task so willingly and immediately in my hands as I […]

Read the full post A Stay-set # 3 Record Bench Plane on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

lots of nothing......

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 1:11am
I sure felt like I should have had more to show for tonight than what I thought I did. I was expecting a few toys to be waiting for me but I only had one show up. I still haven't heard from Bob about my saw being ready to come back to me. I wasted my lunch time trying to find the proper name of the "A" plumb bob thing I am making with no luck. I thought I would have found something because it was used to make the pyramids in ancient Egypt. So it has a bit of age not to mention history. And I'm still waiting on my book from LAP to come in. I'm starting to get a wee bit nervous that the USPS might have given my book to someone else.

I'm adding to my whining above a lack of sleep. I don't know why but I woke up this morning a few tics after double balls (midnight - 0000) and I could not get back to sleep. After tossing and flopping like fish out of water, I finally got up at 0300. I remember having a dream before I woke where I was using my "A" plumb bob thing to build a log cabin and my shoes started to unravel at the seams. That is when I woke up. Maybe I'll finish the dream tonight and find out why my shoes unraveled.

new strops cut out
All 3 of them are tad over three inches wide. The far left one is 11 1/4" long and the other two are an inch longer. I am going to weigh them down with a plane for few days to flatten the roll in them. Then I'll glue them to a substrate, probably 3/4" plywood.

big square came in
This is bigger than I envisioned it being. I was going to stop with this and forgo getting a 12" one but I may have to adjust that thinking. This is a big ass square.

17" on the outside
15" on the inside
happy face on - it's square on the inside

square on the outside
The outside edge of the wooden handle is rounded. The inside edge is square and faced with a brass plate. That doesn't explain why the outside edge isn't square too. It doesn't appear to be something the previous owner did but maybe came this way? It is a slight round and not pronounced at all.

ear to ear smile now
This is my Chappell square (18" model) and it says it is dead nuts on the inside.


square on the outside
In spite of the rounded edge, I had no problems feeling and getting the framing square aligned on the 15" square.

I like the size and capability of this square
I had looked for some one still making a 15" square and a company in England still does. At that time it was almost $200 to get it here across the pond. I didn't get it because there were 10 negative comments on it for every positive one. That is why I bought the Chappel square instead. After only a few minutes playing with this, I may have a hard time giving it to Miles.

It won't fit in the bottom
fits in the big till
I am not a fan of having a square flopping around in a till. I like having them secured and protected from getting banged by other tools. For the time being I'll keep it in here but it won't be staying here long term.

lots of room
I made the half laps a bit longer because I knew I would be sawing these off.

cleaning up "A"
legs are still off

measured, marked, and sawed off the longer leg again
still a 1/4" off
The left leg is 4 7/8" and the right one is 4 3/4".

I think I'm chasing tail
I planed the right leg flat to match the line on the dog block and I'm still off. Before I go off into La La Land, I'm going to have to think a bit about this.  The top angle for the legs being off is really screwing around with my brain bucket. I don't have the plumb bob yet so I'll set this aside for now.

doesn't look like the middle
This is similar to finding the center by drawing the diagonals on a square and I wasn't sure if it would work on this angle. I measured the 'center point' in four cardinal directions and they were all the same. Visually it doesn't look to be the center but the measurements tell me it is.

rough handle has had a chance to set up
I don't like it
It too big, sits too tall, and it looks like total crappola to my eye. The arch on the bottom isn't even and one leg (left) leans outboard slightly. The scale is off but I do like the color contrast between the walnut and the mahogany. But that is not enough to get me to use it - it's burnt toast.
I'm going knob and handle free
I'm not going to use the feet on this neither. I'll sand this and put on some shellac and call it done.

planed the twist out
Checking with the sticks on the half way point to both ends.

why not
No twist on the edges too.

I planed out the hump
I shut the lights out and headed upstairs. I won't work in the shop if I start to yawn.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is phobophobia?
answer - a fear of phobias

Plane talk

Oregon Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 5:35pm
I have written about my frustration with not being able to use planes on the douglas-fir slab because of all the tearout.  Douglas-fir tears out fairly easily anyway and all the wild grain and knots just made things impossible, at least that's what I thought.

I had one more piece of the slab I used to make the dining room table, the only one with no knots and  I was determined to get to the bottom of this issue.  I began by using the power hand plane to get the rough surface down to within about 1/16" of flat.  I didn't use a scrub plane because the last time I tried it tore out something fierce, 1/8" in places.

What I tried first was taking a sharp #3 set to take very shallow cuts.  I used it across and on both diagonals to the grain and it worked really well:


I also gingerly tried it with the grain but it started to tearout, so I stopped.  I was still puzzled about why this has been so difficult.  I have flattened my bench, which is cvg fir, with minimal tearout and successfully made other things out of fir.

I decided to do some research and essentially found what I have read previously except in a more extreme form.  Several experts recommend setting the chipbreaker absolutely as close to the edge as you can possibly get it when planing difficult wood, literally a few thousandths.  The reasoning is precisely that it breaks the chips before they can tearout, producing accordion like shavings and only a slightly rougher surface.  Neither put emphasis on a tight mouth.  One suggested a bevel-up plane with a blade sharpened at a very steep angle as an alternative, something I have.  The blade becomes its own chipbreaker.  Being risk averse, I decided to give both of these a try with the grain on the bottom of the slab.  In both cases, I sharpened the blades carefully before beginning.

As you can see from this picture of the sidegrain, it isn't difficult to predict where it would tearout.


With the #3 freshly sharpened and the chipbreaker set as close as I could get it, I tried planing with the grain.  Nothing happened.  Taking the plane apart, I discovered why.


There wedged between the plane and the chipbreaker were the accordion shaped shavings.  Not hard to figure this out.  I purchased this plane a while back, sharpened it, tried it, and it worked fine, so that's all I did.  Visual inspection of the front of the chipbreaker attached to the blade looked just fine, but it clearly wasn't when the chipbreaker was set this close.  There was enough of a gap that the chips could force their way in.  The fact that I use the ruler trick on my plane blades may have been a contributing factor, I don't know.  After I cleaned up  and shaped the chipbreaker, the plane started producing nice accordion shavings with no tearout, just a slight roughness in places.  This is what the shavings looked like.


As you can see, they are somewhat short because they tend to break off.  Next, I decided to try my Lee Valley bevel-up smoother with a 50 degree blade.  In this case, the blade acts as its own chipbreaker because the angle of attack is 62 degrees.  It too produced shavings without tearout, but they were distinctly different, not accordion-shaped and more continuous, leaving a surface that was slightly smoother. 


The major difference between these two planes was that the bevel-up plane was noticeably harder to push.

That left the issue of why I had experienced such bad tearout with old #7.  I removed the Hock blade and chipbreaker to look at them and this is what I saw:


The chipbreaker was set fully 1/16" back from the edge.  Sharpening the blade and moving the chipbreaker up to the very edge of the blade gave me long continuous shavings with very slight tearout, easily removed with a cabinet scraper.


You can see what a tight roll the chipbreaker being set up like this produces.  I think the reason it isn't accordion shaped is that the Hock chipbreaker is at a lower angle than the stock Stanley one.  The front of it has the same shape as the blade and is about the same thickness.  It's like a second blade turned over and with a slight bow in it.

What are the takeaways?  First, I don't know why I have to continually relearn this lesson, but when something isn't going well it pays to stop and figure out why rather than just blundering ahead. 

More significantly to readers of this blog who are hopefully not beset with this failing, the advice to set the chipbreaker absolutely as close to the edge as you can get it when planing difficult wood is confirmed.  You don't want to do this normally, because the resulting accordion shavings are not continuous and leave a somewhat rougher finish.

Finally, I think Lee Valley's claim that the low angle smoother with a 50 degree blade will do a good job on difficult grain is also confirmed. 
Categories: Hand Tools

A small barn for the summer house 13, internal boards.

Mulesaw - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 2:12pm
I have been making some progress on the internal boards for the small barn.
Those were the boards that I had to shift inside as I was called to work a week earlier than anticipated.
So the first task was to shift all of them out again. I decided that I could work around the table that was inside, but I still needed to move the chairs and a bit of other stuff outside before starting the actual work.

The boards are the same type as those that were put on the sub roof. It is not a typical type of boards to use for internal paneling/boards, but it is of a much better quality than the regular type used. In Denmark the usual boards to be used would be something called "rustic boards". They are made out of the surplus Christmas trees that grew to fast so they were too large to sell. The distance between the growth rings is typical 3/8" or thereabouts, so the wood is of an exceptionally poor quality. The shape is like a tongue and groove board with the tongue something like 1/2" too long. So once the boards are mounted, there is a trench between each board. They are available in various widths and either nature, or artificially whitened, smooth or rough sawn.
But that aside - I chose the other type because I think they look better in a classic barn, and they were actually cheaper per square meter (or square foot if you like).

I mount the boards using regular nails. I know that a pneumatic nail gun is faster, but I actually like to hammer in nails, so I go for the slow and old fashioned way.

Once all the boards are mounted, I plan on putting some strips of wood in the corners and around the window sills, to cover the gaps.


Internal boards mounted.

The "famous" stack..



Categories: Hand Tools

Video: Hi Vise Build

Benchcrafted - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:26pm


Watch Guy Dunlap build our Hi Vise in this excellent video from our friends at Highland Woodworking.

Hi Vises are in stock and ready to ship.
Categories: Hand Tools

Sjobergs Elite Work Bench on E Bay

David Barron Furniture - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 12:48pm

Here is a Sjobergs Elite workbench with 3 days to go on E Bay. It looks like the 1500 mm size which is great for the garage workshop and comes with a useful storage module. These sell for around £1,400 new so a starting price of £750 is very reasonable. This one has a proper tail vice which is better than the full width vice of the current model.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sjoberg-Carpenter-joiner-woodworking-bench/253228044636?hash=item3af591515c:g:~L4AAOSwIFtZ8jjG
Categories: Hand Tools

Dugout Chair: Fastening the Seat

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 12:44pm

Every step of making this dugout chair has been a little weird. Fastening its seat in place was no different. After cutting the seat to shape using using the help of ticking sticks, I rasped the rim of the seat until I could wedge it inside the trunk and get it level. I usually use a 6” spirit level for this task, but I left it at home. So I […]

The post Dugout Chair: Fastening the Seat appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Hand Planes

Northwest Woodworking - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 10:44am

Some folks think of hand planes as artifacts. Some consider them cute antiques. Others have the best of intentions to use them on a project some day.

I consider my hand planes to be time savers. They cut out sanding chores, they shave impossibly thin shavings so I can fit joints together perfectly, they smooth and flatten. I would be lost without my kit of hand planes. Their roles in the shop has increased even as my number of machines have. They can do chores that machines cannot.

Saturday we host another workshop at the Studio on Handplanes: Tuning and Using. Join us for the quiet satisfaction of tuning and then using a hand plane. Can’t beat it.

 

 

1-Bedrock plane-002


Categories: Hand Tools

Perch Stool Part 2: Legging Up

The Renaissance Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 6:44am

I Laugh in the Face of Tapered Compound Angled Mortises

The process of boring the tapered mortises for the legs is a lot simpler once you just do it. You will hear lots of talk about rake and splay angles and resultant angles and sight lines. Some internet searching will yield any number of results on how to bore the angles using mirrors and lasers and by standing on one leg after 3PM on a Tuesday. The way I was taught during my first Windsor chair was much less angles and precision, and mostly eyeball and feeling my way through it. Even today with so much great instruction on the subject that didn’t exist 10 years ago I still find Windsor construction to be a very organic and forgiving style of construction.

I say all of this to urge you to suspend the questions for a minute and just bore some holes. Using the seat pattern that Peter Galbert so helpfully provided we know the location of the sight lines, the location of the holes, and the resultant angles. So grab a bevel gauge and an auger bit and go to it. Remember that the reamer can correct a lot of disparity that may result while you bore your holes.

Reaming Tip Not Covered in the Video

I neglected to talk about this in the video and frankly I got lucky when my workbench intervened and stopped my reamer from going any deeper. Remember that while you are reaming that you do want to maintain the diameter of the hole on top of the seat. The tenons have been rounded down to a minimum diameter of 1/2″
but if you keep pushing the reamer will widen the hole all the way through and you will have to drive your legs in so far that you will shorten the legs unnecessarily. So keep an eye on the depth of the reamer and if appropriate but a stop block underneath your seat to ensure you don’t widen the holes on the top of the seat too much.

Next Live Broadcast

12 PM on Saturday 11/4/17

I carve the seat so that it delicately cradles my posterior

Octagonal Legs?

Don’t want turned legs? How about tapered octagonal legs often found in Welsh Stick Chairs?
Categories: Hand Tools

yo-yo weather.........

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:17am
The weather has been a little screwy lately. It has been unseasonably warm but one day last week had dipped down into the 40's overnight. We also had one day where it rained all day like a cow letting go on a flat rock. That day sucked because I got soaked going into work. We still haven't had the first frost of the year and tonight it is forecasted to rain again with high winds > 50MPH. Not that I'm complaining because everyday that is warm is one less day I have to pay for heat.

quiet time work
I worked on fitting the lid and cleared most of the other crappola off the bench.

two strops?
I am going to make at least two strops out this. One more for me that is longer than the ones I have now and one for Miles. The strops I have now are about 8" long and 3" wide. I think the width is ok but the length is too short. I can get 3 strops from this piece of leather each one 3" wide by 12" long.

walnut banding is solid
The glue appears to be ok with holding the walnut. There aren't any gaps anywhere that I can see. I am not depending upon the walnut to hold the lid on. The banding is to hide the strips I glued on the bottom of the lid.

very snug fit
The lid goes on this way and won't fit when I flip it 180. It probably would if I thumped it but I didn't want to chance popping the banding off.

marked the connection
I marked the lid  and bottom for the best fit before I glued the walnut on. It fits this way but not 180.

chisel action
I used the chisel as a scraper and went around the inside of the lid. I concentrated on getting any glue residue off first and checked the fit. It fit on the numbers and when I flipped it 180. It was a wee bit snug, but it fit.

tight on the left and some daylight on the right
I scraped the inside of the walnut until I saw daylight all around. I then sanded the top outside rim of the box with 120 grit. That did two things for me - first it loosened the fit of the walnut and it closed up the toes on the miters. I finally got the lid to fit both ways, equally well.

rounded over the lid banding
I sanded this corner again. The toes of the miter are closed at the top and open at the middle. I sanded coming from both sides until the miter closed up.

rounded over the top of the lid
Made a decision regarding this box. Taking the lid off is too much to do one handed. It is too wide to easily and comfortably be removed one handed. It needs a knob or a handle to do that. I won't be using this box to keep the 140 in. I'll have to make a 3rd 140 box.

first knob choice
Don't like it and I won't be using it. I thought of making a base or a pad for it but I don't think even that will help this look.

3 more knob choices
The metal knobs are toast but the ring pull I kind of like. I think that would look ok with a base for it. I think a base is needed to beef this up because the lid is only a piece of 1/8" plywood. Without a base behind any kind of a knob or handle, the lid might flex.

found some feet
I had forgotten that I had these. Since it isn't going to be the 140 box anymore, I'll use them on this. I can give this as a xmas present with a gift certificate in it. Or stuffed with some of my daughter's favorite candy.

going to make a walnut handle
flushed
Worked on flushing this while I thought of what I wanted to make for a handle.

#8 hollow
I squared up the walnut stick and used the #8 to knock off the corners. I wasn't trying to make it round but just come up with a shape that was inbetween round and square.


fixing the Disston 6" square
I didn't like the look of the walnut handle so I worked on this square while I thought of something else. The light area on the bottom square isn't daylight. It is what I filed to bring the inside of it square. The outside was dead nuts and didn't need any help.

done
It took a few extra cha-cha dance steps but it is square now. I did 3 checks for square. The first was with the 6" engineer's square, second was drawing double lines on the plywood, and third was checking the square edge on the plywood. All three passed and I did one more final check with the 6" engineer's square. I have a 15" square coming and I should have that next week. That will complete it for these style of squares for Miles's toolbox. I still want to get a 4" sliding square and I might have to bite the bullet and buy a Starrett.

half laps on the legs done
Now that the leg half laps were done, I flipped this over and marked the brace for it's half laps.

feet leveling
Because I planed one shoulder on one leg more than the other, the angle between the legs changed. I sawed the legs at the original bevel angle but since the legs aren't even, the horizontal brace isn't parallel to them neither. Once the glue has set on the brace, I'll saw and plane flush the overhanging parts. The ugly looking gap will be history come tomorrow.

I had to plane one leg square, the other one was sawn square
here you can see the tilt in it
According to what I read, this won't effect the reading you get. You take one reading this way and mark where the plumb bob hangs, flip it 180 and repeat. The plumb will be between the two lines. You just have to look at where the plumb bob is hanging in relation to your plumb line to see which side is high/low.

I wanted parallel
I drew a line on the bench and put the legs on it and adjusted it until the brace measured the same from that line to the brace on the outside of both legs. Once I had that I marked the legs and sawed them off. I didn't go nutso on this, I was shooting for an eyeball close look and I got that.

had to make a pit stop
I dropped this off the bench right on the point. This is the backside of the knife after I restored it. I still had a bit more to go but I was very surprised by how easily I did it. This was my first experience sharpening a japanese anything.

got my point back
I tried it out and it felt as sharp as when I first got it.

decided to sharpen the iron on my new blockplane
This iron has been hand sharpened and it is out of square. I can tell it is has been sharpened by hand because the bevel is rounded and it is also uneven. First batter is grinding a new bevel and squaring it.

10 strokes on the 80 grit runway
The stripe down by the heel is what I just did. I have a long ways to go before I get to the toe.

got a hump
I wasn't going to do the back because it looked like it had been done already. Took me about 20 minutes to get rid of it.

adjuster knobs
The one in my fingers is the LN knob and the one in the back is a replacement one. It has a bearing where the ring is on the LN one. That makes for zero backlash and a silky smooth adjustment on moving the iron in or out. It is made by an  Australian  and he makes them for the LN 102 and 103 small block planes too. I am going to get one for the LN 60 1/2 and for the 102.

done
Silky smooth, effortlessly made wispy shavings. This is a good addition to the herd and it will get well used by me. I had started lapping and cleaning up the cheeks and sole by stopped. There is some pitting on the right cheek and the sole that wasn't lapping out with 220. I didn't feel like starting with 80 and working up. For now it has been done with 220 and 320 followed by some Autosol. I will do it eventually because I don't like seeing the pits. But for now she is ready to go back to work.

I'll keep it in here for now
Until I get around to rearranging the plane storage under my bench, this will have to live here for now.

replacements for the hasp
The left one isn't brass but a shiny white metal color. If it was brass I wouldn't be putting the black one on.

done
I like this but I am not in love with the cheap look and feel of it. It works well for lifting the lid and the curl is below the top so it won't interfere with crap being piled on the lid. But I will be looking for a replacement that isn't a stamped, cheap piece of crappola like this.


Update: Found a solid brass one from House of Antique Hardware and I almost skipped on it. S/H was $3 less than the sash lift.

the back for the plumbline stick
There is a teeny bit of twist on the far end that I'll have to remove. The author said that this should be twist free. I'll do that tomorrow because I fell off the wagon with taking my arthritis  pills again. My fingers are aching on my right hand and this is a good place to stop. I'll get the stick done tomorrow.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia?
answer - a fear of the number 666

The Melbourne Fair 2017

Pegs and 'Tails - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:33pm
The Melbourne Fair Antique, 20th Century, Art Deco, Vintage 23rd to 26th November Caulfield Racecourse Indoor Concourse Space Gate 23, Station Street Caulfield East, Victoria Opening Night 23rd November 6-9pm, 24th November 11am-6pm, 25th November 10am-6pm, 26th November 10am-5pm If … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Additional Tip Shapes for Dividers

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 4:56pm

final_divider_IMG_9194

We’ve just posted a new video at Crucible Tool’s blog on how to create two additional (and useful) tip shapes for your dividers. One tip is designed specifically for scribing arcs. The other is for cutting inlay or recesses.

While we show these tips on our Improved Pattern Dividers, they can be created on any pair of dividers.

Also in the short video, Raney demonstrates a down-and-dirty way to harden and temper the tips with a torch.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Crucible Tool, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

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