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Hand Tools

gobble, gobble.......

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 11/23/2017 - 2:18am
Happy Thanksgiving to all who hail from the states. Canada already had their thanksgiving day last month and I'm not sure about the rest of the world. I worked with an english guy for 7 years at my last job. He never understood our holidays, with thanksgiving being the worse for him to understand. Xmas was ok, but Labor Day and Memorial day were two others he didn't get. He thought Memorial day was redundant because of Veterans Day. If any other country has a Thanksgiving Day, I hope you have/had a happy one.

added two more to my herd of squares
I got a 8" and a 3" square and I think I'm calling it done for now. I am going to stop looking for a 15" one until after the new year rolls in. If I see one before then I'll buy it but I won't be actively looking for one.

my new to me 8" square, ain't 8 inches
The 3" one (which is a Stanley) is 3".

the upright ones need work
The 12" on the outside is slightly out. The 3" one, which I checked with my 6" engineer square, is off both on the inside and the outside.

I forgot my 6" Disston
I have other things I want to attend to first before I fix these squares. I'll keep them here until I get to them.

scraped the paint on the frog seat
I wanted to scrape this before it has a chance to really set and stick. It is dry to the touch but I'll wait until the weekend before I put it together. I still have to finish working on the chipbreaker and sharpening the iron.

wasn't expecting the box it came in
he said he only used it about 4 times
it has it's own unique personality
The angled rip cuts weren't too too bad to do. Starting the cut wasn't as easy as with my LN dovetail saw but each saw has it's quirks you have to get to know. The crosscut was especially hard for me to start on both of the half pins.

no other problems
Other than getting used to starting the cut, I saw no other particular hiccups with this saw. I especially like the weight distribution on this saw. To me felt almost neutral.

ready to check my magnet attraction
 I opened and closed the till several times and I did my idiot looking shaking of it also. I didn't hear nor feel anything rattling around in here.

that is where two magnets are
Those blacks spots must have a little metal dust in them.

these two are ok and passed all the tests
the next two passed all tests too
Four squares down and two to go.

15" square failed
 I can open and close the till and the 15" will behave and stay in it's holder. It won't pass even 1/2 a shake before it is rattling around in the inside.

I have one more 3/8 magnet for this
This square is heavy and I thought it would pop off on the slam the lid test but it didn't. One thing I will do with this is add a finger access cutout at both of the top corners. That will help to pop this off of the magnets.

12" did a bit better
It took 3 shakes before the 12" let go and started to rattle around in the box. This will need another magnet to help secure it. I ordered 10 more 1/2" magnets from Lee Valley today. The 1/2" magnets are about $2 each and one 3/4" is $9. Now that I have done this test, I'm thinking that I should have gotten at least one 3/4" magnet.

flushed up the front
this will be it's new home
I have a couple box latches coming in with the  magnets. I got two for just in case but I think I'll be ok with one.

got my saws out for figuring the size of till for them
My longest saw is a roughly 24" long, from the top horn to the toe.

nested together
This is the proposed way that I will stow the saws in the till. As they are here the width is less than 5". I'll have to add a few inches to that for the holders for the saws.

I love the fit and feel of this handle
the LN saw has a looser fit
My hand fills the Lee Valley handle without an atom of wasted space. It is better than a glove fit and feels unbelievably good in my hand. The Lee Valley handle is definitely a wow and maybe an extra loud whoopee thrown in too. I think the Lee Valley saw would be absolutely perfect if the LN plate was substituted for the Lee Valley one.

the look pretty similar but the LV handle gets a bucketful of gold stars IMO
rough ID measurements for the saw till
I haven't come up with a design for this yet. I'm pretty sure that it'll have a lid and the saws will go in and lift out through the top. It won't be a book like till like I made for the squares.

the handle is reluctant to come off
no mistaking that this is walnut (it doesn't look like rosewood)
handle came off the second one easier
I don't know what kind of wood this is. My first guess was beech.

my second guess was apple
My third one was I don't have a clue. It doesn't look like the beech I have in my stash. I don't have any apple wood pics in my wood book. It doesn't even mention apple at all. It also doesn't look like the pear wood which I do have a pic of. In the end it doesn't matter. I will strip and refinish both handles regardless of the species. I will clean the saw plates and try to raise a bit of shine on them too.

the finish isn't shellac
I rubbed a towel wet with alcohol on both handles and got nothing. It cleaned up both but it had no effect on the finish at all. I don't have any lacquer thinner so I can't check for it being lacquer. But that is what I suspect the finish probably is.

this plate has a lot of etch to it
All I can make out on it is 'New Bedford Mass' as the bottom line. I'm thinking maybe it is a hardware store saw?

this etch is even fainter
I can barely discern the Disston Saw symbol on this plate. No matter as I don't care about the etch that much but I was curious about what I could pick out.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Convicted murderer William Kemmler, was noted for what?
answer - the first person to be legally electrocuted 1890

H. O. Hickok Bookbinders Machinery Bookbinders Tools Trade Catalog

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 11:17pm

Letterhead: W. O. HICKOCK. Eagle Works, Improved Book Binders Machinery, iron and Brass Foundries, Wood Turning, Ruling Machines, Steam and Gas Fitters Supplies, General Machine Works, Keystone Cider Mills, Keystone Feed Cutters. Harrisburg, Pa, U. S. A., April 16, 1886. To: New Urbana Wine Co... "Gentlemen: Have you old Dry Catawba wines and at what price per two or three dozen quarts." Apparently this was a thirsty bunch. W.O. Hickock is still in business as a machinery manufacturer.

Wohickok1886LH

Hickok Bookbinders' Machinery: Bookbinders' Tools. Catalogue No. 88. The W. O. Hickock Manufacturing Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. c1920. From the famous Hickok Mfg. company, makers of bookbinding equpment since 1844, comes a rare catalog. Judging by the early electric tools, I'm guessing at a c1920 date, but it could be a bit earlier. Nearly out of business at this point, their products remain sought after by bookbinders.

Download HickokCatc1920

HOHickockcvr

Categories: Hand Tools

Jos Harm Album Van Schaven En Gereedschappen c1900 Trade Catalog

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 11:09pm

Trade Catalog: ALBUM VAN SCHAVEN EN GEREEDSCHAPPEN: Rabots et Outils - Planes and Different Tools: JOS. HARM, Vijzelstraat 120, Amsterdam. c1900. (judging by the Stanley Planes offered). This catalog of planes, braces, saws and bench equipment is tri-lingual in Dutch, French and English. Tools shown are primarily Dutch, followed by select items from the Stanley line, then a few French and British style planes. There is a small selection of Dutch style braces and saws, along with replacement handles and bench equipment.

This catalog was clearly published for the Dutch trade, as the Dutch planes are not translated. The French, British and Stanley tools are translated in varying sets. Of particular interest are the varieties of Dutch planes and braces that continue styles often listed as from the 18th Century. Needless to say, this is one of my favorite catalogs.

Download Josharm1900cat

Josharmcatcvr

Categories: Hand Tools

C. Hammond & Son, Edge Tools And Hammers Trade Catalog 1910

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:52pm

Trade Catalog: C. HAMMOND & SON, EDGE TOOLS AND HAMMERS, OGONTZ, PA., U.S.A., 1910. A full line catalog of the hatchets, axes, and hammers offered by the famous C. Hammond & Son. If you find a Hammond hammer, hang on to it and use it. They made some of the nicest hammers ever.

Download Chammond1910CA

CHammondcvr

Categories: Hand Tools

H. Hale, Plane Manufacturer 1854

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:47pm

Manuscript: Correspondence

H.Hale, Plane Manufacturers, to The Providence Tool Col, 1854.

New Haven, Apil 7, 1854

Providence Tool Co.

Gents

We are in want of some Plane Irons Which we should like to have you send to us providing you will sell them low as other makers

Please send us list of prices by return of mail

And, Oblige

H. Hale Co
Plane Manufacturers
Corner St. John & Art.... St.

 Apl. 8

Provtool-hale-1

Categories: Hand Tools

John Graham & Co. Trade Catalog 1920 Witherby Taintor Coes etc.

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:43pm

Trade Catalog: JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO. FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY CATALOGUE, ESTABLISHED 1870. C1920. 112 Chambers Street and 95 Reade Street, New York, U.S.A.. Also offices world wide. Interesting expandable catalog containing a variety of sections covering hand tools, shop equipment, gardening, hardware, etc. For this PDF, I have included only those sections pertaining to tools. To wit: Snell Mfg. Co (auger bits and related tools), Winsted Edge Tool Works (seems to be a full line of tools), Coes Wrench Co., Taintor Mfg. Co, Torrington Co.. Seymour Smith & Sons, L.S Watson Mfg. Co., G.W. Griffin Co., Rock Island Mfg. Co., Asst'd Saw Vises, American Grinder Mfg. Co., Many-Use Oil Co.

Download JgrahamCat1920

Johngrahamcvr

Categories: Hand Tools

Goodnow & Wightman, Tools & Hardware, Boston Ma 1883

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:37pm

Letterhead: GOODNOW & WIGHTMAN, Tools & Hardware. 176 Washington Street, Boston. May 10, 1883. Although this letterhead lacks an addressee, it came from the same group as the next two Millers Falls related letterheads. This is a request for repair and alterations to two vises, to be shipped to Gay & Parsons, Augusta, Maine.

Goodnow1883MF-1

Categories: Hand Tools

Gage Tool Co. Vineland, N.H. 1897

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:35pm

Envelope & Letter: GAGE TOOL CO., Vineland, N.H., April 30, 1897. Envelope and letter from P. S. Gage to his Father, John Gage. Apparently the Gage family was having problems paying their water bills. The letter from P. S. Gage to his father is presented in four parts for legibility.

Download Gagetoolltr

Jgage1897env2
Jgage1897env2

 

Trade Journal Advertisement: GAGE TOOL CO. The Carpenter, 1908. "Only Self-Setting Plane-30 Days' Trial

Jgage1897env2

Categories: Hand Tools

John S. Fray & Company Spofford Braces and Tool Handles. Ad Cover 1894

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:03pm

Ad Cover: John S. Fray & Company, 1894. Makers of Spofford Braces and Tool Handles. I guess that at the time, they felt the need to advertsise their tool handles more than the Spofford Brace.

JsfrayspoffordAdCvr1894 copy-1

Categories: Hand Tools

Ford Bit Company Trade Catalog c1900

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:01pm

FORD BIT CO. Holyoke, Mass. c1896-1900. Yes, this catalog really is that yellow. A nice catalog from one of the lesser known auger bit companies. A great piece of printing design work too. One of the best examples of the "Eastlake" style of late 19th Century graphic design.

Download FordbitCat1896

Fordbitcocvr

Categories: Hand Tools

Falcon Pope Planes, Pope Industries, Adelaide, Australia Booklet

Toolemera - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 9:54pm

Booklet: Falcon Pope PlanesPope Industries of Adelaide, South Australia, manufactured metal planes under the Falcon brand. Courtesy of Jeremy Kriewaldt 

Download Falcon Planes (1)

Falconpopeplanes

Categories: Hand Tools

Octagonal handles for the drawbore pins

Mulesaw - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 5:57pm
Tonight I pulled myself together and started on making some handles for the drawbore pins.
The weather is incredibly bad at the moment, with forecasts of a hurricane (named Ylva) coming sometime tomorrow on the Norwegian west coast. Wind speeds are predicted to be around 50 m/s (112 mph).
At the moment we are a bit south of the places that are expected to be hit the worst, but guess who is scheduled for sailing north this morning?..

We have already strong winds and high waves, but making a handle isn't the project that requires the biggest amount of accuracy.

I wanted to use a bit of my bubinga, and There was a part left on one of the large pieces that was just the right size for my purpose.
My initial idea was to saw of this end and then rip it to make the handles, but I decided that it was probably going to be a lot easier to rip the part first, and then saw it off. I had decided on a length of 11 cm which is something like 4 and 3/8".

Once I had four small pieces all approximately the same size, I squared one of them up a bit using a plane. two of the sides plane nicely and two sides don't. It is really some strange grain, and I had a bit of tear out. It isn't a plane tote, so I can live with a less than perfect surface, because it is not a tool that will be handled over a long period of time, so the chances of getting blisters by it are close to non existing.

I eyeballed a pleasing taper and planed it without too much trouble. The fat end of the handle is something like 1 1/8" and the thin end is approximately 13/16"

With a square tapered shape, I drew some lines with a pencil on each corner to define the octagonal shape. It is not an equal sided octagonal, but It doesn't have to be.

I planed down the corners and once I was happy with the result, I flattened the end with a file, so the piece stood up straight.
I marked out the center in the thin end and drilled a hole the size of the tang of the drawbore pin.

The edges of the fat end were then chamfered using a chisel, and finally the handle was sanded. When I used my fingers as backing for the sand paper, I was able to smooth down the small pieces of tear out that were left on the sides.

I only made one handle today, but since I didn't find any major obstacles in my course of action, I think that I can make the remaining 3 tomorrow if the weather permits it.

The drawbore pin has not been hardened yet, so I didn't mount the handle.

Octagonal handle next to drawbore pin.

Ripping.

Removing the corners.

Octagonal handle. 

Chamfered end.


Categories: Hand Tools

Anarchist’s 2017 Gift Guide, Day 1: Kershaw Knife

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 3:51pm

Every year, I write up a gift guide that discusses the small items that have made a big difference in my shop.  These are items that are ideal for gifts – it’s difficult to ask your toddlers for an Altendorf table saw for Christmas. I hope that these items are useful to you. If you have any complaints about this gift guide, please submit it here. The first item is […]

The post Anarchist’s 2017 Gift Guide, Day 1: Kershaw Knife appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

About the Lump Hammer

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 3:34pm

lump_hammer_IMG_9770

Want to make your own or modify an existing tool? Rip off our specifications by reading this blog entry at Crucible Tool.com.


Filed under: Crucible Tool, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

“Tables” Video Now Available!

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 12:46pm

 

At long last, this “Tables” video is done and in our store. Mike has been laboring over this thing for a long time now perfecting each transition and tweaking each clip to get everything just right. I am blown away. It turned out better than I even envisioned. If you enjoyed watching our “Foundations” video, we think you will love this sequel.

This “Tables” video focuses on pre-industrial table construction. Rather than simply demonstrate each different operation of table making and its variations, we decide the best way to teach is in the context of a build. For this reason, I chose a table that has many of the construction variables one is likely to find in period work. The table is a pine “kitchen” table with tapered legs, a single drop leaf, H-stretchers, and a drawer. During the editing process, when we wrote down all the chapters and topics covered, Mike and I were surprised to see how much ground we were able to cover in this video. (No wonder it took us so long!)

Here are the time stamps for the video:

00:00:00    Introduction

00:04:29    The Table Form 

00:11:21    Terminology

00:12:48    Design

00:16:48    Stock Prep

00:31:37    Sharpening

00:52:04    Table Joinery

01:14:13    Tapering the Legs

01:46:47    Scratch Stocks

02:03:17    Turning Drawer Knobs

02:07:40    Breadboards

02:23:07    Final Assembly

02:26:53    The Drawer

02:37:32    Dovetailing the Drawer

02:55:07    Fitting the Drawer

03:05:07    Leaf Hinges

03:07:06    Rule Joint

03:08:01    Painting the Table

03:11:50    Burnt Shellac

03:19:23    Fastening the Top

03:21:12    Pocket Screws

03:23:29    Final Finishing Details

03:26:14    Leveling the Feet

03:29:30    Conclusion 

You can purchase the new video here. The streaming version is available for immediate viewing (download option will be ready later this evening). The DVDs are in production now and we are expecting their delivery mid-December. We will ship them out as soon as we get them. 

We are so proud to offer this video series and hope you find it an inspiration for your shop time.

-Joshua

 

Categories: Hand Tools

How Long?

Northwest Woodworking - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 9:14am

Someone asked me how long it took to write my new book. It’s like asking how long it takes to cut a dovetail. The actual work may last only an hour or two, but the preparation takes years.

My new book is called Handmade, Creative Focus in the Age of Distraction. Find it at Linden Publishing: http://www.woodworkerslibrary.com/woodworking-books/handmade-creative-focus-in-the-age-of-distraction/

The book required almost two years to write, fix it, fix that version, rewrite it, throw it away and make a third version and edit that into what is now a book form.  The stories in it come from my life at the bench and on the hiking trail and with my students and the work that I have produced. It is a book about creativity, inspiration, and the value of failure and forgiveness in this work that we do with our hands.

Join us next Wednesday, November 29, for our DESIGN: Open House for the book launch. We start at 6pm. It’s free, open to all, and will be good fun if you join us.

 

Front cover 1.jpg


Categories: Hand Tools

Finishing Workshop @ CW – Rubbing Out

The Barn on White Run - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 7:15am

The conclusion of the finishing workshop at the Anthony Hay Shop of Colonial Williamsburg was rubbing out the finishes we had already completed.

Given that my normal routine of using Liberon 4/0 steel wool and paste wax was not an option as steel wool was not part of CW’s vocabulary, we instead concentrated on those things which were typical for that era; pumice powder, tripoli powder (rottenstone), and pulverized chalk (whiting), delivered in slurries of mineral oil, naphtha, and diluted paste wax.  The latter would probably have been some formulation of beeswax, turpentine, and tallow.

The first step was to make new polishing pads analogous to the spirit varnishing pads, with the difference that the stuffing was comparatively unimportant.

Then the work began with pumice, followed by tripoli.

The results were splendid.

New Online Course – Pembroke Table with Glen Huey

360 WoodWorking - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 6:28am
New Online Course – Pembroke Table with Glen Huey

Happy day before Thanksgiving. As you prepare for your holiday celebration with family and friends, take a minute to check out the newest online course offering from 360Woodworking.com, Pembroke Table with Glen Huey. (If you’re a member of our community, you have free access to the project. I’ve sent an email message to each of you describing the project and providing instructions on how to pull the new course into your “Online Courses” tab.)

If you’re not yet a member, you, too, can take a look at the project and course.

Continue reading New Online Course – Pembroke Table with Glen Huey at 360 WoodWorking.

Trailer for ‘Roubo Workbench: By Hand & Power’

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 5:01am

Above is a trailer for our video “Roubo Workbench: By Hand & Power” that Will Myers and I shot earlier this year. If you are thinking about building a French workbench using a giant slab, you might find the 4-hour-long video helpful.

The video is downloadable and has no DRM (digital rights management), so you can put it on any device you like and carry Will (and my off-color jokes that survived the editing process) with you wherever you please.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized, Workbenches
Categories: Hand Tools

Woodwork at City Hall

Tools For Working Wood - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 4:00am

I was at City Hall on Monday morning, testifying in front of the City Council subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises. This was a slightly different subject than the one I testified about a few weeks ago, but the concept is the same - resist intrusion on what little manufacturing space is left in New York City. This was the first time I had ever been in City Hall and the first time I was in the Council Chambers. Built between 1803 and 1812 and remodelled several times since, New York City's City Hall is actually a pretty small building and isn't used much for the day-to-day running of the city. That happens across the street in the giant Municipal Building.

I don't know how much of the wood, stone, and plaster architectural details date from the original building and how much is from a pre-Civil war rebuild, but it is all awesome!

The hearing was about the merits of allowing as-of-right self-storage units to be built in Industrial Business Zones, areas in NYC that are specifically restricted to manufacturing uses. Currently it is legal to do so, but a new zoning law would ban it. The Council was holding a hearing about an amendment to the law that popped up recommended by the City Planning Commission to allow self-storage as-of-right after all, negating the law. Thankfully, most, if not all, the City Council members present felt that manufacturing jobs are better than self-storage dead space. They also expressed their views that sneaking in an amendment to the new zoning law (which was carefully debated and then approved by almost all the City's local Community Boards, neighborhood advisory groups that weigh in on issues like zoning) is kind of dirty pool. The sentiment was against the amendment.

My testimony was the same as before - you can put self-storage units anywhere in the city, but we are desperately short of manufacturing space. And by dangling possible exceptions in front of developers, you just drive up the price of property and rents based on anticipated speculation.

What I really want to do in this blog entry is just show off the woodworking and architectural detail of the space. My (ancestors') tax dollars at work! It is wonderful and worth every penny!

It's actually stonework but this is a really graceful spiral staircase
The white paint makes the doors pretty sedate but the detailed carving is amazing
In the old days the windows would be open. There is an abundance of paneling and wainscotting. Sort of Federalist - but not really.
Look at the huge book-matched paneling, the columns and the Captain America shield chair seat.
Sitting in the public speaking chairs - in the gallery are visiting students from a local school
View from my seat giving testimony
More details about a door. I assume the mirrors were there to increase the room light in pre-electric days. A candelabra might go on the stand in the center.
Wonderful carved insert placed in various intervals along the molding atop the wainscotting around the room
Carved detail above the podium
Desks for the Councilmembers - a traditional design - probably from day one. Not in use today we sat on folding chairs. What a comedown.
Large panels of book-matched wainscotting are everywhere
Some of my favorite details - the crown molding.
Not to be outdone by the joinery, the ceiling has stars all over it with giant low relief panels in each order. The detail is wonderful, I am not sure if the carvings and stars are plaster or applied wood carving.
I'm not big on selfies

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