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General Woodworking

Beach walking; late fall

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - 48 min 25 sec ago

I try to not go out in December. Certainly when I do, I try to only go to places without Christmas music, chaos, traffic and the other trappings of the “season.” The actual season; late fall/early winter, is one of my favorites. Marie & I went to the beach yesterday. I shot a few photos, and when I uploaded them, found some from a beach walk about two weeks ago. (click the photos to enlarge)

Marie & I saw a few scattered sanderlings (Calidris alba) – but this photo of mine is from the earlier walk.

We couldn’t find any loons yesterday; I got this one earlier. I think it’s a red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) – we’ll see.

There were many, many eiders out on the water. Hundreds of them…this photo is a fraction of the flock.  (Somateria mollissima)

What we came for was this figure in the dunes:

The first snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) of the season for us:

Marie’s shot:

snowy owl by Marie Pelletier

While I’m raiding her photo stash, here’s her sanderling shot of the day:

Sanderling by Marie Pelletier

Time to turn around and head back;

 

The sun was going down as we made our way back down the beach. I turned & got a shot of the clouds over the Gurnet:

 

 

 

A rare view of Marie – she’s usually behind the camera at Plymouth CRAFT:

 

One last one, from the earlier trip, Daniel drawing in the sand:

 


How to Darken Oak Furniture with Ammonia Fuming

Wood and Shop - 5 hours 8 min ago
In this video I show a historical method for darkening white oak furniture with industrial strength Ammonia, inside a makeshift plastic fuming tent, and I do it on a pair of Shaker style quartersawn white oak end tables. My most recent video & article showed how these end tables fit together (here) and

Digital Artistry — Meet the Artist: Darrell Peart

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - 8 hours 18 min ago

Meet the artists from the December 2017 issue How five masterful makers integrate CNC and CAD technology into their woodworking In the December 2017 issue of Popular Woodworking magazine, the article, Digital Artistry gives the readers a peek at what five professional woodworkers are doing with digital tools in their shops. Each has an extensive traditional woodworking background and many years of experience before they added digital tools like CAD […]

The post Digital Artistry — Meet the Artist: Darrell Peart appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Coping Saw Blades

360 WoodWorking - 8 hours 31 min ago
Coping Saw Blades

Is there a difference in cuts of copying saw blades with higher TPI? You bet. But the best reasons to make the switch may not be for the reason you’re thinking.

I’m beginning a new project that involves using my coping saw. Whenever I use this tool I immediately think back to my days building houses and installing the trim, especially baseboards. Each corner was coped for a better fit. (You cannot get away with simply butting to 45° cuts.)

Back then we worked primarily in pine.

Continue reading Coping Saw Blades at 360 WoodWorking.

Product Video: How to Use a Card Scraper

Highland Woodworking - 8 hours 39 min ago

If you’ve been looking for a better way to finish your work, look no further than the humble card scraper. Card Scrapers can cut finishing time in half, removing glue squeeze-out, leveling across joints and eliminating tearout, while providing a great surface for applying finish.

In the video below, Matt Cremona takes a closer look at Card Scrapers, the unsung heroes in the workshop. Watch the video below to learn the basics for adding a card scraper or two to your own tool kit.

The post Product Video: How to Use a Card Scraper appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

the batting line up.......

Accidental Woodworker - 14 hours 57 min ago
The lead off was the glue up of the saw till box and I'll continue to work on that. Batting next is one tool rehab of which I have a lot waiting to be done. In the on deck circle is the chisel roll around cabinet. I decided to start work on it despite saying I was going to concentrate on doing tool rehabs. I am looking forward to having all my chisels in one place. And having that place readily accessible right by the workbench.

As it is now I have 5 sets of chisels stowed in boxes, scattered around the shop. My bench chisels are kept in a box on a shelf under the right end of my bench. These are the ones that I use 99.99% of the time. The others don't get much use because it is too much of a PITA to hunt them down, clear all the crappola burying them, to use them. The roll around will solve that problem.

out of the clamps
All of the half pins were cupped away before the glue up. They  are all tight and good looking now 24 hours later.

the opposite end
The half pins on this end were cupped too but not as bad. Or it could have been the other end. I know now that all the joints are closed up tight with no gaps. One end cap was cupped more than the other but that is a moot point now.

a wee bit proud
I will have to flush the pins and tails before I saw the lid off. There is a bit of proud here and there due to the pieces not being all the same thickness.

not twisted
I have clamped dovetailed boxes with cauls in the past and clamped twist into them. There isn't any twist on this side. I need this to be twist free for when I use the tablesaw to cut off the lid.

other side is twist free too
this side is square
opposite side is off a strong 32nd
I checked this side with the same diagonal from the other side. With that setting I was off on this diagonal and snug on the other. I changed the sticks to measure this side and it came out square.

done
This is going to be a gift card card box.

the tray
I spray 4 coats of shellac from a rattle can on the handle. I glued it with hide glue.

the red felt dresses up the box some
the next tool rehab
got my parts
much better than eBay
This 78 will be a user plane and I have no qualms with using a new part. Most of the prices on eBay for a fence rod started at around $20. I would have bought one of them but I was leery about buying a bent one.

new fence rod is dead nuts square
It was a bit stiff and hard to thread at first but after a couple of cycles of in/out, I could thread it all the way down and off with my fingers.

very snug fit
I saw some crud and rust(?) in the hole in the fence that slides up/down on the rod so that may be the cause of that.

new rod on the left   old on the right
A couple of notable differences between the two. The new one is slightly longer, the end opposite the threaded end has a larger chamfer, and the turn hole is smaller and closer to the end. The last difference is the threaded end. On the original there is a small space that is unthreaded and it is a smaller diameter than the rod. On the new one, it is threaded right to the rod. There is no small unthreaded portion. I would think that would make the replacement rod stronger than the original and less prone to bending.

definitely out of square ( original fence rod)
original fence rod
You can see that the threaded portion is bent. That small unthreaded portion is the Achilles heel and I think it is the reason why these are found bent so often.

road testing it
I never did a road test on this because the fence rod was bent. I put it back together with my iron instead of the one this came with. I got the fence on the rod but it was a struggle. I had to gently tap it on and off. This is also my before pic to compare to the ooh and ah rehab pics.

nice feel and easy to use
No particular problems making this quick, shallow rabbet. The iron wasn't as sharp as I thought it was. It will definitely need some love from the stones.

not canted and appears to be straight, end to end
depth stop
This is a robust stop. I applied only finger pressure to it and it held for making this rabbet. It will definitely need further testing to see how it holds up for doing a lot of rabbets.

quick clean and degreasing of the fence
There is a lot of crud stuck in the nooks and crannies. I got all of it removed with the help of the wire brush.

light sanding
Most of the japanning came off with a few strokes of the 150 grit stick. I kind of thought I would repaint this and now there is no doubt. I'll try stripper on this tomorrow and see what that does.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that a hemidemisemiquaver is a musical 64th note?

Perfectly Imperfect Furniture

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 9:44am

I’ve long been fascinated by handmade utility furniture: the kind of stuff made to be used, not admired for the craftsmanship invested in its production. In the early 1980s, I bought an old chest of drawers from an antique shop in Reading, a large industrial town southwest of London, where I lived at the time. It was made of a nondescript softwood known as deal and had originally been painted. […]

The post Perfectly Imperfect Furniture appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Straightening Up

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 6:10am

 

 

 

 

With the shed roof line as straight as we could get it (there was still a tiny bit of dip but I was fearful of literally tearing the building apart if we went any farther based on the screeching coming from the building itself) we began the steady process of assembling in-place the laminated post-and-beam to replace the sagging wall.

We started by assembling the posts complete from three laminae of 2x8s with the center board being off set the width of the beam dimension and notched a couple of inches to serve as the tenons so that the beams could be assembled in-place fairly simply.  This also provided good purchase for the concrete we were using as the footer ex poste.

Since the rear corner being the highest, we shot for everything eventually becoming level with it.  So as the posts were constructed moving forward, we had to dig out holes in order to make all of them the same length.   Once the structure was complete I began the gentle lifting of the front corner with a post and hydraulic bottle jack.  Even I was astounded to recognize that the front corner needed almost 16-inches of raising to get everything level-ish.

With that I filled each footer hole with dry concrete mix, and old trick I learned from a deck-builder friend of mine, who said that you could use dry concrete in holes like this and it would absorb moisture from the ground and set in fairly short order.  I have used this method numerous times in the past and it turns out he was right.

The following week I dismantled the original wall and salvaged almost all of the material to use as the new 3/4 wall.  That new configuration, along with the new structure, has transformed the space from a sagging, foreboding cavern into a robust and airy storage space for the tools and machines necessary for maintaining the homestead.  For the moment I have left the rear section of the wall un-built as we are debating the desirability of a door opening there.

survived another glue up.......

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 12:54am
The plan today had two parts. The first was to finish my xmas shopping which I got done by 0830. Getting two gift cards completed my list for 2017. The second item on the hit parade was to glue up the saw till box. Happy to report all went well in Mudville but saying it's 100% will have to wait until tomorrow.

One thing I forgot to get was a piano hinge for the saw till.  I drove right by Home Depot not once, but 4 times, and I still didn't stop and get it. I remembered it after I got home and was feeling a bit smug with myself for being done with my xmas shopping.  I'll have to make a pit stop at Lowes sometime this week. That will be a 'dear diary...' entry for sure.


quiet work
I need a couple of supports for the tray and I'm using walnut. This is too wide and I'm ripping it to a 1/2" wide.

putting them on the short ends

The tray is light weight and stiff enough to span between the ends without sagging. Besides I doubt a chevy small block would fit in it anyways.

checking the fit of the cardboard bottom
I checked to see whether or not I could fit the cardboard in with the tray supports in place.  I could so I can glue the felt on this and install it after it has set up.

the tray fits
This definitely needs a handle to take it out and put it back in. It isn't a piston fit but there also isn't a lot of wiggle room neither.

had to drop the tray down because of the lid stops
fits
I have less then a 16th of clearance between the lid stops and the top of the tray. I did it to maximize the storage under the tray. The lid is seated on the top of the box all the way around.

supports just glued in
No clamps are needed because I got a snug fit. I don't think it is necessary to add screws or nails to the supports.

the knob nut
Nothing more annoying in life then a knob that won't stay tight. A couple of drops of locktite should help remedy that.

marking the ends of the groove
The depth of the groove is 5/16" and I marked the end of the groove to be 1/4".

first one done, 7 to go
sliding square set to the depth of the groove
I used this check my progress as I chopped the groove.

where it rises
This is how far back from the ends that the groove starts to rise above 5/16" deep. This is pine and it was easy to level the groove out to the end.

Yikes
This split on me when I tapped the chisel to deepen the wall on the outside of the groove. It was a clean break and I glued it back on and set it aside.

missing a piece from the end of the groove
The small missing piece I had and blowing that out happened before I did the big split dance step.

can you see it in the pile
I dropped the small piece on the deck and I couldn't find it. I will glue in a scrap after the box is glued up. I am painting this so putty and paint will hide all my sins.

how to best cut out the panels
I need a chunk of this that is roughly 1/2 of the sheet width but only 3/4 of the length. Is it best to crosscut the end first or make a long rip cut and then do the cross cut. I opted for the long rip cut only because it was the safer cut to make first.

width is too fat
I used a story stick for this and I didn't understand how I was off. I checked the stick and I added an extra 1/4" for some reason. That is how much this cut is off.

figuring out how to glue this up
The way I'll glue this up is to put the sides in the grooves first on the long sides. Then I'll put on the ends. There really isn't any other way to do it.

I'll have to wait a few hours for this to set up
the width is a bit too tight
I am just barely touching the pin with the square. I trimmed a 16th off for a bit of wiggle room.

sawed some clamping cauls
The two ends are slightly cupped and I couldn't remove it with clamps. I need these to help pull the pins and tails in tight.

bottom in
I'll have to replace this because the lower left corner had glue bleed through it.

length is too long
On the dry fit I couldn't fully seat the ends and this is why. I trimmed an strong 16th off and the dry fit closed up nicely then.

rehearsing the glue up
I'll glue the sides into the long grooves and then glue the ends on. I'll be using hide glue for this.

second dry fit looks good
Houston we have a green light for glue up.

it wasn't as stressful as it looks
The trickiest part was taping the cauls in place before I put the clamps on them. I did the long clamps first and then the short ones.

I added two more clamps after this
I couldn't check this for square and I'm relying on the plywood panels to square up the box. It really doesn't matter that much if this is a little bit out of square. I will let this cook here until tomorrow.

grinding my big chipped chisel
This is virgin territory for me. I have never ground anything before be it by hand or with an electron munching machine. The experience was an eye opener. It wasn't the onerous outing I thought it would be. One biggie that really surprised me was that I hogged off a lot of metal and the chisel never got too hot to touch. I didn't have any problems with drawing the temper out of the chisel which was a big concern for me going into this. I still dipped the chisel in water as I ground it.

it looks to be square
and it is
Seeing and maintaining square was ridiculously easy to do. I basically didn't even try to do it. I was mainly trying to remove metal. The square just happened as a by product.

blurry pic of a big flat at the end
I did the removal of the chip first without trying to maintain the bevel. Once I got the chip removed, I switched to establishing the bevel again. Another surprise was the time it took to do this. It took me 8 minutes to grind the flat down to the bottom of the chip. After that I tried to get my 25° bevel.

rounded bevel
The bevel proved to be a little more problematic to grind. When I checked the bevel it was between 30 and 35 degrees. I don't know how I got a rounded one as I was expecting a hollow one.

partial 25
I think I can finish this up on the 80 grit runway. This grinding adventure overall went pretty well. I didn't have a warm and fuzzy about grinding one handed but that turned out to be a non issue. The biggest hiccup I had was how to hold the chisel when grinding the bevel. Which direction to turn the grinder was another issue. I think I tried every combination possible of holding and turning without any one of them saying," pick me, pick me". One important aid I will be making is a tool rest for grinding a 25° bevel.

got a blister to remind of the today's grinding exercise

the blister maker


It's wood and it is fixed. As in it doesn't turn as you crank the grinder. I'll have to look at it and see if it does because it doesn't make sense for it not to.

a smaller chip to remove
After my bevel grinding of the big chisel, I will try to remove this one on the 80 grit runway first. If that doesn't work out I'll try grinding it.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that there are 5 categories that stars are awarded for on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? (Motion Pictures, Television, Radio, Recording, Live Performance/Theater)

#3 rehabbed.....

Accidental Woodworker - Sun, 12/10/2017 - 2:10am
winter wonderland at1500
My wife and I were talking about the white stuff today. Neither one of us could recall the last time snow was on the ground before xmas. I remember a much different climate and time when I was a young boy compared to now. Back then there was usually snow before thanksgiving and it was unheard of not to have lots of snow on xmas day. Everything changes, including the weather.

Fiskar paper cutter
I got this from amazon earlier this year. I use it at work to trim and cut paper down to 8 1/2 x 11. It didn't have any problems cutting the cardboard inserts for the box and tray. It wasn't as easy as cutting paper but it did it. It didn't stall in the cut but it did take a bit of oomph to push the cutter through it. All the cuts were came out smooth with no ragged out edges.

working the #3
Since I had the 80 grit runway out, I decided to finish the #3 I got from Ken Hatch. It is in pretty good shape as is and shouldn't take long to get it to the ooh and ah stage.

slight hollow at the heel
 This hollow runs from the heel, almost down the center of the sole up to the toe. It doesn't show up that well in this pic but I can see it. The hollow at the heel is proving to be a PITA to remove. This is considerably smaller than what I first saw almost an hour ago. I want it gone and have the sole dead nuts flat from toe to heel.

an hour later
I finally got it. I didn't work on this for an hour straight but in 10 minutes bursts followed by 10 minutes (or more) of rest. When I got consistent scratches from toe to heel and from side to side, I went on to 120 grit.

the sides need work
 Both sides are going to need a bit of time to flatten out based on the scratch patterns I see in them.

metric plywood from Woodcraft
UPS said that this was on the truck for delivery on friday by 2000. 2000 came and went and I didn't have my plywood. This morning when I checked the UPS site, it said it would be delivered on monday by 2000.  When I left to get chinese for lunch I saw the package on the front steps. I'll be working on the saw till tomorrow.

120 grit batting next
After 80 grit, going up through the other grits doesn't take much time. The 80 grit is for removing metal and making things flat. It takes a while to get through it. The successive grits are mostly for scratch removal and it takes very little time on each one.

done up to 400 grit - it's shiny
I go up to 600 grit and stop there. I don't have a 600 grit belt and I do it wrapped around a block of wood.

degreasing and cleaning the interior
done
Cleaned and degreased.  The japanning looks to be 99% intact. What I am not sure of is whether or not this is the original japanning. Either way this is the best japanning I've seen on any plane that I have rehabbed to date.

sharpened by Ken Hatch
I will leave this as is. I would normally round the corners of the iron because this is a smoother. I do that so I won't leave tracks in the wood. Since I am passing this on to someone else I'll forgo that. Whoever gets this can do that if they desire to and they can touch up the iron if they want to also.

fettling the chipbreaker
I stone the inside bottom edge of the chipbreaker. This allows the chipbreaker to lay on the back of the iron with no gaps between them. This way no shavings can get underneath the chipbreaker. This doesn't have to be overly large and I strive to get it gap free first.

leading edge
I stone this up to the 1200 stone and then I strop it. I do this so the shavings will readily pass up and over this.

brass is shiny and the small parts are cleaned and oiled
600 grit
This is the last step to be done before I put the plane back together.

the last step in the rehab
I love this stuff. Not only does it shine up the planes, it protects them too. The shine does fade a bit, but not much, over time. But what I am really liking more is this will keep the planes clean looking for 3-4 months depending upon how much I use them.

this took a while
Getting even shavings from both sides kicked my butt this time. The hardest part was setting the iron/chipbreaker so the lateral adjust wasn't shoved all the way over to one side. I finally sorted that out and the reward was this.

it's ready to go to work
I thought I had a before pic of the #3 but I couldn't find one. Ken Hatch had given it to me and it had a broken lever cap. I had one in my spare parts and that is the only part I had to replace. Now it's ready to start another chapter in it's woodworking life with a new owner.


glamour shot #1
#2
#3
If I was keeping this plane I wouldn't do anything else to it (other then touch up the iron and round the corners) and would put it to work. I didn't type it but I will bet donut holes against dollars that it is a WWII vintage plane. I'm basing that on the one piece studs holding the tote and knob in and the thick walls of the plane.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that Gene Autry is the only person to have 5 stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame?

5 Inexpensive Gifts a Woodworker Will Use

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 2:01am

This year when people ask me what they should get their woodworking family and friends for the holidays, my first answer is always a board of hardwood. But if they have a tool in mind, things get harder to suggest. Below are items I recommend because they work for most types of woodworking and if they already have one, then having another is welcome. 1) Sloyd Woodworking Knife – On […]

The post 5 Inexpensive Gifts a Woodworker Will Use appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

16 days to go......

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 12:37am
It's official now and proof that winter has arrived is on the ground. My daughter in North Carolina sent me a pic of it snowing there. She said that they are expecting 4-6 inches of the white stuff. I think the last time it snowed in NC, George Washington was president. We are supposed to get the same treatment here overnight going into tomorrow. I'll keep happy thoughts and wait and see what unfolds.

experiment
I did this last night before I went to bed. I wasn't sure what the results would be.


glued the felt to the plywood
I was pretty sure that I could glue the felt to the cardboard. What I wasn't sure of was how it would turn out. Would the felt be hard and brittle, or would the glue have bled through it?

it looks pretty good
The felt isn't stiff and hard nor did the glue bleed through to the top. It isn't as soft as it is without being glued, but it is fine for this application. I just want this to dress up the bottom. The red felt looks way better than plywood.

two pieces for the bottom of the box
Now that I know gluing the felt works, I'll repeat it on the bottom. I cut these out with a small cutting board that I have at work.

how I did it
Here is how I did it Frank. Step one is to draw lines from each diagonal to mark the center of the cardboard.

where they cross is the center
squaring a line across the width
Since I cut this on my paper cutter, it has four square corners. I checked them to make sure.

need a bigger square to make this line
got my two 90° square lines
line up the center line of the handle on the short 90°
eyeball the handle centered on the long square line
trace the outline of the handle
get a brand new razor blade
Resist the urge to use the razor that you opened up two days ago. In fact be ready to open up another one after doing only one cut. You are cutting through the cardboard and the felt and the blade could dull quickly. If you feel any drag at all stop and start again with a fresh razor. I was lucky and was  able to cut this out with one blade.

clean edges all around
I like this a lot
got  two more Howard adjusters
I broke down and got one for the LN 103 which LN no longer makes. The other one is for the 140.

the only one without a Howard adjuster


I will have to check the Howard adjuster site and see if they sell one for this block plane. If they don't it will be the only blockplane that I don't have one for.

not needed anymore


I'll stick these in a drawer somewhere, I'll forget where I stuck them, and I'll be scratching the bald spot trying to remember where someday. The offer still holds if anyone needs one. Drop me an email and I'll send it out to you. My short term memory should recall where I have them for about a week or so.

got another coat on the box - at least one more to go

I got one coat on the tray and I'm going to put 2-3 more there and call it done. It doesn't need as many as the outside of the box is getting.

going to sharpen my 6mm chisel
I need this to finish the grooves on the saw till. I am supposed to get the 6mm plywood on monday so I'll have the weekend to do them.
it's not too bad
After 5 strokes on the 80 grit runway, this is what I got. I have a tiny bit at the toe to remove and doing that didn't take too long.

the best I ever remember seeing this chisel
the back just needed a touch up
I was surprised by the flatness of the back. I don't remember doing it back then and even if I did, it probably was barely adequate. My sharpening skills back then on scale of 1 to 10 was a -35.

I'll sharpen and hone up the rest of the herd
these two have chips
The last time I sharpened these was on the Sharp 3000 gizmo. It used sandpaper on glass discs. It worked ok but I went through a lot of sandpaper and I found it to be very wasteful. It only used one small band on the sandpaper. I sold that on ebay about 8-9 years ago. That is how long it's been since I used these chisels.

the biggest chisel has a big chip missing
Removing this chip is going to eat up about a 1/4" of the length of the chisel. I have never had to remove this much metal to establish a new bevel. I'll start with my hand cranked grinding wheel first and see how it goes on that.

my new 1 1/2" AI chisel
This is the back after dancing down the length of the 80 grit runway. I had two high spots when I checked it about a quarter of the way down and by end I had this. Another thing to add to the A-list.

1700 already
It seemed like I just got to the shop and it's time to leave.  Leaving at 1700 is one rule I try not to break.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know insecticides were the first products marketed in aerosol containers?

Unsquare Dance

The Barn on White Run - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 4:29pm

 

Back in the mezozoic era when I was in college, I hosted a late night jazz show on the college station.  My theme song was a Dave Brubeck piece (as would be the case with any civilized person in that situation), in this case Unsquare Dance.  For whatever reason this tune, or more precisely the title, leaped into my head when I first saw the juxtaposition of the new and magnificent stone wall with the whomperjawed lean-to attached to the ancient log barn behind the root cellar/granary.  I’d always recognized it was a bit off-plumb, but goodness the comparison was sobering.  My desire to get it straightened out needed to become action.

About that time my younger brother came for a week-long visit.  We are pretty much two peas in a pod, although he is a better marksman than am I.  He is an excellent carpenter and builder, so once I knew his schedule I ordered some 2x8x8′ pressure treated SYP to use in building the new wall structure.

The strategy was to assemble  stick-built laminated beam to serve as the top plate for a post-and-beam configuration, about a foot inside the original wall.  But first we had to jack up the roof to some semblance of planarity, which we accomplished with hydraulic bottle jacks and extra 2x8s to wedge the roof to the height we wanted.  It took a day of gradual lifting, but we finally had it ready to work on.  The foot worth of swale was as gone as we could get it, and it was time for the hard work to begin.

 

Week One Winners – December to Remember 2017

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 10:51am

The first week of December to Remember is over! I have drawn the following winners at random. Continue to enter throughout the month of December! December 1: Jim Dunn, Alabama December 2: Donald Nay, West Virginia December 3: David Hodgerson, Iowa December 4: Douglas Slater, Wisconsin December 5: R. Mark Underwood, Texas December 6: Eric Webb, Georgia December 7: Heidi Smith, Michigan

The post Week One Winners – December to Remember 2017 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Holiday Gift Projects! Table-Top Skittles

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 3:00am

Editor’s note: With the holidays upon us, we’re looking through the magazines and books we own for fun handmade gifts – things that you can build in not too much shop time, but that will help to create a lifetime of memories for the recipients. This is Holiday Project Post number five – for the “Pint-sized Pickup,” click here; for a Craftsman-style Wall Shelf, click here; for “Heirloom Photo Album” […]

The post Holiday Gift Projects! Table-Top Skittles appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

fretting for nothing......

Accidental Woodworker - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 12:52am
Three orders were supposed to have been delivered by Amazon already. I'm ready to have a myocardial infarction wondering who got my stuff. I couldn't check on the status of my order at work because you have to sign into amazon. I didn't have my password with me so I had to fret and worry and stew about until I got home.

When I got home from work the first thing I did was to sign into amazon and bring up my order status. I was expecting  to see 5 outstanding orders and there were only two. According to amazon, I never placed 3 of the orders. My wife would have been the recipient of the short end of this stick.  After checking the order history again, I placed the orders and signed out. I signed back in to amazon to ensure the orders had gone through and they had.

I found a problem with the blog today. I don't know how it is happening but some of my blog posts are being doubled up on one date. The hiccup started on the 23rd of november with several posts being dated for the same day after that up to dec 5th. That isn't right because I have posted a new blog entry every day for the past several years.

I corrected the nov and dec double postings with what I think are the correct dates. I noticed some doubled up dates for sept but I didn't change them (I'll check them out this weekend). I think I updated the nov-dec problems so that they weren't posted again. I'll check the date when I post in the future to ensure it is the correct day.

calling them done
I made these back in feb but I didn't put any finish on them. Both of them still have stains on them that I couldn't sand out neither. A couple of coats of shellac made them shiny and a bit more presentable.

1 1/2" Ashley Iles chisel
Someone was offering this up on the Creek for $55, shipped, so I got it. It doesn't even look like it has been sharpened. In fact the previous owner said he didn't think he had. This will be put in Miles's chisel roll with the other AI chisels.

Honduran rosewood
My new knob and tote for my #6 came in from Doz. He does a damn fine job on these.

for Frank
I cut out two cardboard inserts for the tray bottom. One is a snug fit and the other is loose. I'm undecided on how I want the cardboard to be secured in the tray. If I wrap the cardboard cloth underneath it, I'll use the loose fitting one. If I trim the cloth even with cardboard edges, I'll use the snug fitting one.

the snug fitting one is the lead off batter
I need to make a cutout for the handle in the cardboard so I can glue it to the bottom plywood of the tray.

lots of red felt
I thought I had some adhesive backed blue felt but I can't find it. But this is also one time where I think that I used it all so that is why I can't find it. I don't want to chance ordering more of it and not having it come in on time so I'm using the red felt.

found the center of the handle
handle position marked and ready to cut out
I found the center by drawing diagonals and then making 90° square lines to the center point. I eyeballed the handle centered the long way and lined up the center of the handle with the center of the cardboard. I penciled the outline and it didn't have to be super duper precise. There will be red felt all around the handle that should cover any gaps.

it isn't laying flat on the bench
It looks like it is but the handle is self supporting in the cardboard. After I fix the felt to the cardboard, I'll cut out the felt in the area of the handle hole.

felt has a crease in it
I'll have to ask my wife about ironing this crease out. Even when I stretched the felt, I could still see it. If the ironing doesn't work I'll cut out another piece.

Got all of 23 minutes of play time in the shop tonight. That is ok as it was much more important that I sorted out my order problems.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that Lucy Hayes, the wife of President Rutherford Hayes, was the first presidential wife to be referred to as the First Lady?

New Old Stock of Italian Made Breast Drills

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 8:20am

A while ago I blogged about a Breast Drill that I bought on eBay and restored. I also mentioned that it is hard to find a good quality drills with concealed gears on the market today. After I wrote the blog I found a supplier of drills who held (and still does) a few tools on stock. I bought one drill for myself and three for our woodworking program. The […]

The post New Old Stock of Italian Made Breast Drills appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Arched Bridge – Finis

The Barn on White Run - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 5:02am

The final day of bridge building involved cutting, painting, and installing the decking, which was made from the same 1×6 material used for the beams.  Prior to installing the decking I mounted electrical wires to the underside of the structure.  These are the wires that 1) carry electrons from the solar panels on the cabin to the power system, and 2) will eventually carry electrons back to the cabin from the system.

Before

After

A little debris clearing, including the old plank walkways, and the job was done for now.  I’ll let the paint weather a bit, then wait for a warmer sunny day to sand it and apply another coat of paint, sprinkling the sticky paint with play sand to give it better traction.

Between the new stone wall, arched bridge, and new wall on the lean-to on the old barn (more about that later), the vista from the side deck has been transformed.

The Rabbit Hutch – Part 8

The Bench Blog - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 1:00am

The rabbit hutch project is just about complete, but before I wrap things up there is one last element that I want to add.  I decided as part of my design to include an insulated box that the rabbits could go into in the worst of the cold weather.  In the wild, they’d be able to go underground to escape the worst of winter’s bite and it doesn’t seem fair to stick them in a wire cage above ground without adding a little extra protection from the elements.  I wanted to make a small box that was somewhat insulated and that their body heat will keep the box warm.  Sort of a hutch within a hutch.

Before I get any further, if you are so inclined, you can see the earlier posts in this series here:

With the roof made, I started on the insulated box.  I’ll make a frame from 1-inch square Douglas fir and skin it inside and out with ¼-inch ply.

Starting to cut the pieces to make the insulated box.

Starting to cut the pieces to make the insulated box.

I milled up some stock, cut it to length, and then cut bridal joints to fit the frames together.

All the stock, ready to go.

All the stock, ready to go.

Bridal joints, cut at the table-saw.

Bridal joints, cut at the table-saw.

When assembled, the parts make three rectangles.

When assembled, the parts make three rectangles.

Each was glued and clamped.

Each was glued and clamped.

One end will be a solid wall, but the other needs to have an opening for the rabbits to get in and out.  Since the opening will always be open, I’m not sure quite how effective the insulation will be, but it can’t hurt.

I added some dividers to frame the will become the entrance.

I added some dividers to frame that will become the entrance.

Starting to cut the quarter-inch ply that will become the walls of the box.

Starting to cut the quarter-inch ply that will become the walls of the box.

The plywood gets glued and nailed on, and some spacers were installed with pocket hole screws.

The plywood gets glued and nailed on, and some spacers were installed with pocket hole screws.

I added some isolation from left over batting from my chicken coop project.  I realized that there wasn’t very many points to attach the floor, so I added some scrap blocks with glue.

Preparing to install the floor.

Preparing to install the floor.

 

After the floor, was the panel for the inside roof.

A piece of plywood added the inside roof.

A piece of plywood added to the inside roof.

Followed by the inside back wall.

More insulation into the back of the box.

More insulation into the back of the box.

Covering the inside end.

Covering the inside end.

Now it's starting to look like a box.

Now it’s starting to look like a box.

Installing some scrap pieces to support the inside end plywood.

Installing some scrap pieces to support the inside end plywood.

More insulation.

More insulation.

The end piece of plywood gets glued and nailed on.

The end piece of plywood gets glued and nailed on.

I’m not sure if the insulation will help, but it is easy to add.

Now for the other end.

Now for the other end.

I added the left end, which covers the door opening.

I added the left end, which covers the door opening.

You can see where the plywood covers the door.

You can see where the plywood covers the door.

I added the outside roof panel.

Things are progressing nicely.

Things are progressing nicely.

Cutting out the excess plywood from the door opening.

Cutting out the excess plywood from the door opening.

With everything assembled, I rounded over all the edges with a trim router then spackled and sanded the whole box.

I used a round over bit in the palm router to soften all the edges of the box.

I used a round over bit in the palm router to soften all the edges of the box.

After some spackle and sanding.

After some spackle and sanding.

I decided that since the end would be open all the time, I should add a small divider to the inside of the box.

I installed a removable divider.

I installed a removable divider.

The divider is held in place by some wooden strips that are glued to the inside of the box.

The divider is held in place by some wooden strips that are glued to the inside of the box.

I didn’t have enough 1″ Doug fir stock to make the doors, but I did have some appropriately sized Cedar in the lumber rack, and used that for some of the pieces.

Time to make some doors for the box. Bridal joints again.

Time to make some doors for the box. Bridal joints again.

Glued and clamped.

Glued and clamped.

These will get plywood door skins.

These will get plywood door skins.

Here's where they will fit.

Here’s where they will fit.

The inside plywood skin is installed flush with the frame.

The inside plywood skin is installed flush with the frame.

These doors are also skinned with plywood.  On the inside of the door, the plywood is flush with the frame.  However, on the outside, the skin overlaps the edge of the frame.  This meant of the outside skin had to be quite accurately positioned.

Glueing on the plywood skins.

Glueing on the plywood skins.

I’m really starting to like the technique of using your bench and holdfasts as a giant clamp.  It works great.

Holdfasts provide great even clamping pressure.

Holdfasts provide great even clamping pressure.

Laying out the hinges.

Laying out the hinges.

Since this is an outdoor project, I used galvanized hinges with brass pins.

Hinge mortises cut.

Hinge mortises cut.

First door installed.

First door installed.

Chopping more hinge mortises.

Chopping more hinge mortises.

Insulated doors installed.

Insulated doors installed.

They just need a bid of paint.

They just need a bid of paint.

A wooden spacer on which to mount the catch.

A wooden spacer on which to mount the catch.

Installing some door latches.

Installing some door latches.

That’s about it for the insulated box, but before I install it, I decided to make a barrier for the ramp opening on the upper level.  This was quick and simple from a couple of pieces of ply and Doug Fir.

A quick barrier to go around the ramp opening.

A quick barrier to go around the ramp opening.

A lick of paint.

A lick of paint.

Ready to install.

Ready to install.

Nailed in place.

Nailed in place.

With that done, I can install the insulated box that sits above it.  In the below image you might just make out my pencil marks.

Marking screw locations on the inside back wall of the hutch.

Marking screw locations on the inside back wall of the hutch.

Drilling a quick pilot hole from the inside.

Drilling a quick pilot hole from the inside.

And then a countersunk hole from the backside.

And then a countersunk hole from the backside.

Installed on the back wall. Now it just needs a ramp.

Installed on the back wall. Now it just needs a ramp.

All the screws installed. That box isn't going anywhere!

All the screws installed. That box isn’t going anywhere!

As the box sits up above the main floor, the rabbits will need another ramp to get into it.  I used the same method as on the earlier ramp.

Time to make another ramp.

Time to make another ramp.

Nothing fancy, just side rails and plywood.

Nothing fancy, just side rails and plywood.

And some glued on bits for traction.

And some glued on bits for traction.

The ramp was screwed to the side of the box.

The ramp was screwed to the side of the box.

Here's where it sits.

Here’s where it sits.

And some guide rails.

And some guide rails.

And that’s all folks!  The rabbit hutch is done.

In the next post, I’ll clear and level a spot of ground to install the hutch and show all the final reveal photos.

More soon.

 

– Jonathan White

something is wrong with the blog........

Accidental Woodworker - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 12:58am
Over the past few days I've gotten some comments and emails about my blog. It seemed that some people aren't getting the feed from Unplugged shop. I don't know what is causing it but the blog on my end has been acting screwy for a while. I noticed it over a week ago when the numbers from the blog tanked. They had been fairly steady for the longest time and then poof, they were in the crapper. Since then the numbers have fluctuated up and down. Again, I have no idea what is causing it.

The blog at work staring acting up before the numbers went awry. At first I thought it was the work servers but now I don't think so. I can't always get the current day's blog to come up at work. I gave up looking at stats because they fail to load 99.9% of the time I try.  Sometimes I can read the comments but in the last two weeks, except one instance, I've not been able to post my comments.  I get a 'page can't be displayed' error when I try to post comments. For the most part my blog at work is only for reading, when I can get it to load, and not much more of anything else.

I found the work snafu a PITA. I write the blog at home and I would proof read it one last time each morning at work. In past two weeks I've been able to do that once. I have also been publishing the blog from my phone.  Publishing from my phone is a fun filled adventure especially so because it seems I suffer from FFS - fat finger syndrome.

So far at home, I haven't had any of the work related hiccups. The numbers are still OTL but everything else seems to be working ok. I can read, post comments, and view stats. Maybe the servers at work are the problem but I am hesitant to blame them. I would think the problem would be more consistent and iron clad. Occasionally I have been able to have full functionality and that doesn't sound like a computer problem.

handle stock

I dug this chunk of walnut out of my scrap box and used the tablesaw to get a couple of pieces to make a handle.

looks better than poplar would
I will shape this so it looks better than a chunk of wood in the middle.

finally got rid of the tear out
I used the big scraper and it worked. I was using small scrapers that were made from saw blades. I got rid of the tear out by using a corner of the big scraper. I sanded it after with 220 and it's ready for some finish.

grabbie hollows
I used the #8 round to start these but the going was tough because the iron is dull. I finished the shaping of it with a rat tail rasp. I smoothed it with some 100 grit wrapped around a dowel.

done
I rounded the top corners off to lighten it up. It doesn't feel to bad to grab. I'm sure the person getting this doesn't have ham hock size hands. This should be just right for her.

I am thinking about how to secure this and the cardboard bottom too. Right now I'm leaning in the direction of making a cutout in the cardboard for the handle.


more shellac work
 I think I will call the orange boxes done. They are not in great looking shape but still look like the old kitchen cabinets. The other box is not done as I plan on putting at least 3-4 more coats on it.

I ordered the plywood for the saw till. I got a 30x48 inch piece of 6mm plywood. I also bought a couple of pieces of 12mm to experiment with. When I will get it I don't know. It took 5 days for the 6mm to come from my last order but with xmas season shipping, your guess will be as good as mine. I will finish the grooves on the saw till this weekend.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that Thomas Edison (the light bulb inventor) was married twice and fathered 6 children?

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