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Tool marks

Owyhee Mountain Fiddle Shop - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 1:29pm
Purfling installed on 4 plates (2 fronts, 2 backs) and now working down the arching.  Here is a spruce viola top.  Parallel gouge marks from the rough arching.  Smaller (aka smoother) tool marks around the purfling now, smoothing out the perimeter.  Starting to take the gouge marks along the spine out with finger planes. Then onto scrapers.  Then onto horsetail.  Smaller shavings with each successive tool.
Categories: Hand Tools, Luthiery

Knife Makers and Enthusiasts – An Event for You!

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 9:03am

Editor’s note: Blade Magazine is published by F+W Media, our parent company and my cubical is next to the organizer of Blade Show. I thought our west coast readers would be interested in hearing about this event! If knives aren’t your thing, disregard! – David Lyell Join Us Oct. 5-7 in Portland, Oregon BLADE®, the world’s No. 1 knife media brand, announces the all-new BLADE Show West in Portland, Oregon—the Knifemaking Capital […]

The post Knife Makers and Enthusiasts – An Event for You! appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Installing the Lake Erie Toolworks Wood Vise Screw (With a Twist)

Highland Woodworking - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 7:00am

In the February issue of Wood News, Norm Reid walks us through his leg vise installation. It isn’t just a typical installation though – Norm is combining two vise systems into one:

I really liked the idea of using a wood screw, partly because I liked Scott Meek’s and partly because of my love affair with wood. But the Benchcrafted system comes highly recommended. I decided to combine the two systems, using the Crisscross mechanism in conjunction with the Lake Erie screw.

Read the entire installation article here

The post Installing the Lake Erie Toolworks Wood Vise Screw (With a Twist) appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

WW18thC 2018 – Peter Follansbee

The Barn on White Run - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 5:24am

Renowned furniture maker Peter Follansbee presented two sessions at WW18thC, the first concentrating on the making of 17th century carved frame-and-panel chests, the second on making chairs.  Peter looks like someone who planned on attending a Dead concert and found out he wandered into a woodworking shindig.

His comfort in front of an audience and well-deserved confidence in his ability is heartening.  And his artistry with carving flows from his hands naturally, seemingly effortless.

His second session was an ambitious attempt to make a green-wood chair in 90 minutes.  He got close.

How Do Suppliers Do It…

Paul Sellers - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 4:57am

…I mean, how can they get it so wrong? There I was, prepping a chisel, brand new, straight from the box, about to tell people you won’t go far wrong with a set of Faithfull (UK), blue plastic-handled bevel-edged chisels. I don’t vouch for all of their tools because they tend to be more an […]

Read the full post How Do Suppliers Do It… on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

it is my turn........

Accidental Woodworker - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 2:19am
This morning when I left for work it was 55°F (13°C) and when I got to work it was almost 58°F (14.4°C). T shirt weather but wait, there is more. About 90 minutes later I had to go to my truck to get my k-cups and the temp had dropped to 47°F (8.3°C). Still not to bad of a temp for the second week of February, but a wee bit on the screwy side. Tonight it will dip into the low 20's F (-6.6°C). The temps will be on a roller coaster until later on in the week.

can we guess what this is?
Tomorrow morning I will have a colonoscopy. These pills and the Gatorade are the prep work I have to do tonight. At 2000, I have to drink another bottle of this stuff mixed with some powder. I'm glad all this only happens on one day.

holder set up
According the instructions I got from the hospital, I could have anywhere from 20 minutes to hours before I start the toilet trots. I tried to squeeze in what I could before that race started.

it is nose heavy
I think this is ok as is but if not I can add a circular holder at the nose later.

why it is nose heavy
There are two 'stops' on the screwdriver that these supports are on. They keep the screwdriver from shifting left/right.

flushed the back brace
I had to do something with the square look of this. A circular cutout will look better.

piece of cardboard
I used this to make a template so the two ends would be the same.

should have done this before I glued them on
But I didn't so I had to use the coping saw. This didn't go off so well because the saw is big, this is small, I had a hell of time clamping it so I could saw it, and one of the holders was in the way. Did I mention that I don't have a lot of practice with a coping saw? After the fact I realized that I should have turned the blade away from 90.

I had to use very short strokes
This side didn't come out that bad. I was off the line on top half of it and removed it on the bottom half.

Yikes!
It was very awkward sawing this end as it shows. Being in a hurry was a major contributor to this boo -boo also. Since I don't want to make another one, I'll fix this somehow.

flushed the drawer slips
Worked on this while I thought of how to fix the screw up I did with the coping saw.

epoxy and sawdust to the rescue
blue tape
This piece of tape will keep the epoxy and sawdust from oozing on through.

packed it with epoxy/sawdust mixture
I will let this set up and tomorrow I'll evaluate it as to whether or not I'll leave it as is and apply a clear finish. If it looks like crap, I'll paint it. I had to quit here because the race started.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know in liquid beer measures that a firkin equals 9.8 gallons?

Changes (Good Ones) at Lost Art Press

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 6:54pm

LAP_logo2_940

Thanks/no thanks to the turmoil in the world of woodworking publishing, we have acquired another editor to work on our books, blogs, videos and other projects.

This announcement should be no surprise.

All of you know Megan Fitzpatrick, the former editor of Popular Woodworking Magazine. During the last 11 years, she’s always been happy to help Lost Art Press with editing, which she did on the side whenever she could spare the time.

Today, Megan joins Lost Art Press as a managing editor. Like Kara Gebhart Uhl, Megan will work on all of our titles on a daily basis. This addition to our staff will have profound implications for you, the reader.

Here’s why. Kara and Megan can already read my mind, and they were both an important part of creating the ethos that guides Lost Art Press: 1) Treat everyone with the same respect. 2) Give away as much content as possible.

With both of them on board, I can step away from doing every single task involved with publishing our books. Kara and Megan will manage the day-to-day tasks of book publishing. This frees me to research and write more books for Lost Art Press. This has always been my greatest (and perhaps only) strength.

Please don’t think that this means that I am stepping away from Lost Art Press. I work seven days a week (by choice and by joy), and Lost Art Press is my baby. Bringing Megan on as a regular ensures that I can continue to explore the unknown, while she and Kara ensure our books are of the highest editorial quality.

Don’t believe me? Just wait.

— Christopher Schwarz

Categories: Hand Tools

Winter Wonderland

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 5:44pm

It took until the first weekend in February for us to get any decent snowfall, and it did look lovely here in Shangri-La.  It closed everything down for a couple days, but we were snug as a bug in a rug.  We’ve had plenty of frigid weather (coldest temp this winter thus far was about -15F, wind chills to about -40F) but only a few light snow falls up to now.

Int’ Oslög – Not Uncrafty

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 3:12pm

frontcoverJögge Sundqvist’s “Slöjd in Wood” is in the final editing/design stages, and will be off to Suzanne Ellison in the next day or two for the index, and to Kara Uhl for a copy edit. In other words, it’s just a couple weeks away from going to the printer. (Look for another post when it does.)

As I was editing the translation, I was charmed by almost every project – but what I find most intriguing about slöjd is its bedrock foundation in self-sufficiency and using the materials at hand.

But Jogge says it much better than can I, so I’ve shared part of his introduction below. The images at the top and bottom here are the end papers of the sumptuously photographed and illustrated book, and show the tools and supplies he uses throughout.

— Megan Fitzpatrick

There are many different ways of working and joining wood. In this book I will tell you how to work wood using hand tools. I’m dedicated to slöjd because of the tool marks and carved bevels, the worn colors, the idiosyncratic design and the self-confidence of the unschooled folk art expression.

Slöjd is part of the self-sufficient household, how people survived before industrialization. Slöjd is the work method farmers used when they made tools for house building, farming and fishing, and objects for their household needs. For thousands of years, the knowledge of the material has deepened, and the use of the tools has evolved along with the understanding of how function, composition and form combine to make objects strong and useful.

The word slöjd derives from the word stem slog, which dates to the 9th century. Slög means ingenious, clever and artful. It reflects the farmers’ struggle for survival and how it made them skilled in using the natural materials surrounding the farm: wood, flax, hide, fur, horn and metal. I have picked up a dialect expression from my home county, Västerbotten, that has become a personal motto. We say Int’ oslög, “not uncrafty,” about a person who is handy and practical.

In slöjd, choice of material and work methods are deeply connected to quality and expression. To get strong, durable objects, the material must be carefully chosen so the fiber direction follows the form. This traditional knowledge makes it easy to split and work the wood with edge tools. Slöjd also gives you the satisfaction of making functional objects with simple tools. When a wooden spoon you made yourself feels smooth in your mouth, you have completed the circle of being both producer and consumer.

My intention with this book is to give an inspiring and instructive introduction to working with wood the slöjd way: using a simple set of tools without electricity. There are many advantages to this. You can make the most wonderful slöjd in the kitchen, on the train or in your summer cottage. Simple hand tools make you flexible, free and versatile. And the financial investment compared to power tools is very low!

Traditional slöjd knowledge is vast, and requires many years of experience before you can easily make your ideas come to life. It also takes time to master the knife grips, essentials of sharpening and specific working knowledge of individual wood species.
As you work with slöjd, the learning enters your body. Through repetition, you will gain muscle memory for different tool grips. The ergonomic relationship between your body and the power needed for efficient use emerges over time. “Making is thinking,” said Richard Sennet, professor of sociology. In slöjd, the process never ends.

Because slöjd is inherently sustainable, it feels genuine and authentic. In an increasingly complex and global society, it is important for an individual to experience an integrated work process from raw material to finished product.

People from all walks of life benefit from the interaction between mind and hand. Slöjd affects us by satisfying the body and in turn, the soul. There is a kind of practical contemplation where there is time for thought – a certain focused calm, which is an antidote to today’s media-centered society.

I think we can use the knowledge of slöjd to find that brilliant combination of a small-scale approach to a sustainable society that doesn’t exclude the necessities of modern technology. Traditional slöjd is a survival kit for the future.

— Jögge Sundqvist, August 2017

backcover

Categories: Hand Tools

A plane for Asger

Mulesaw - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:36pm
I made it home despite a cancelled flight due to snowy conditions in Bergen airport, and Thursday morning I found two packages waiting for me. the one of the I had ordered myself, so that wasn't any surprise. But the other package was a complete mystery, It had clearly originated in USA according to the postal logo on the label.

Curious as to what it could be I opened it and found a letter from Saint Ralph. Ralph explained that he and Ken  had collaborated on sending me a Bailey No 3 hand plane.

The plane was securely wrapped in cardboard and bubble wrap, and was disassembled.

When I started unwrapping the plane my heart sank. Ralph had mentioned in the letter that he had rehabbed the plane, and upon seeing the individual parts I became painfully aware how far from my own pitiful rehabbing efforts the job that Ralph had done was!
Ralph's rehabbing is nothing short of immaculate.

Ken had sharpened the blade, so all I had to do was to assemble the plane, and what a joy it was, to assemble a plane that was already rehabbed.

Right now the kids have a winter vacation, so I plan on giving Asger some instructions in how to adjust the plane, and then I will let him bring the plane with him to school, so he can show his teacher what a sharp plane looks like and feels like.

Thank you very much, Ralph and Ken for this very thoughtful present. It is deeply appreciated, and I am certain that the plane will see a lot of work in the future.


Rehabbed Stanley No 3.

When mirror finish is more than a word!

This is how you wrap a plane for shipping.



Categories: Hand Tools

New Features on the Powermatic 3520C Lathe – Movable Digital Control, Integrated Riser Feet and More Mass

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 10:08am

I recently received a press release that Powermatic brought a new version of their popular 3520 lathe to market.  The new version, “C”, is the 4th generation of the 3520 lathe family. The new features really grabbed my eye, so I gave the product manager for this new lathe, Michael D’Onofri, a call to hear first hand about them. The movable control box allows the user to place the most important controls […]

The post New Features on the Powermatic 3520C Lathe – Movable Digital Control, Integrated Riser Feet and More Mass appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

WW18thC 2018 – Overview and Opening

The Barn on White Run - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 7:15am

I’ve been to several of Colonial Williamsburg’s annual confab Working Wood in the 18th Century (WW18thC), a gathering that always has a central theme of some sort.  This year’s organizing topic was “Workmanship of Risk: Exploring Period Tools and Shops,” and it was my favorite of these conferences (although previous topics of “Surface Decoration” and “Oriental Influences” come in a close second tie).  And not just because I was a speaker; that actually makes the experience less for me because of all the preparation work that consumes crazy amount of time and energy for me.

The presenters for this year included the crew from the Anthony Hay Shop, and their interpretation of a decorated tool chest; the Colonial Williamsburg joiners, demonstrating the consruction of monumental/architectural moldings; Jane Rees, the scholar behind the magnificent decorated lid of said tool chest; Peter Follansbee, recounting the processes of his work in carved 17th century oak furniture; Patrick Edwards, demonstrating classical marquetry techniques; and the inestimable Roy Underhill, with his keynote lecture and moderation of a panel discussion on historical primary sources; and me (more about that in subsequent posts).

There is no way to summarize the richness of the conference content without re-living it with verisimilitude, which could be accomplished only with a literal transcript and live video feed.  But the next few posts will encompass my compressed take on the event.

As is the norm for this event, which normally sells every seat within the first few hours of opening the registration, every seat in the house was filled plus perhaps a few more.  I know that often the deciding factor of whether or not some guest may attend a particular presentation is the occupancy limit established by the Fire Marshall.  All the presentations are in the front of the auditorium on a small theatrical stage, making it difficult if not impossible for anyone beyond the front few rows to see the details of the proceedings.  To alleviate that hurdle and enhance the learning experience for the attendees the entire performance is projected onto a giant screen behind the stage.  It sometimes sets up the weird dynamic of us performing for the cameras, turning away from the audience.

Our start on the first evening was RoyUnderhill, undertaking the unenviable task of decoding philosopher/craftsman David Pye’s influential book The Art and Nature of Workmanship, a book, which Roy avers, has been read by few if any artisans (I think he is correct in this; I ground my way through it some 40+ years ago and never felt the desire to return to it.  It’s on my shelf if the impulse ever emerges).

 

As always Roy was an engaging speaker even given the difficulty of the topic, and demonstrated some of the concepts contained within the risk vs. certainty discussion.  Beginning with a mallet and froe to rive out some lumber workpieces, moving then to a hatchet, and finally to a sabot’s shave, he began the steps of workmanship that might not be “risky” in the hands of a skilled craftsman but certainly have a component of “uncertainty” to them, that uncertainly diminishing with each incremental step.

Roy ended up with an inventory of a complete tool box from ages past, using it and its contents as focal points for the soliloquy.

Scribing, Part Two: Making Cabinets Fit Seamlessly into Irregular Surroundings

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 6:14am

  Rooms are virtually never square, level, or plumb. Ceilings tend to sag toward the middle of their rooms; floors usually do the same. Plaster walls are rarely flat; drywall builds up at interior and exterior corners. You get the picture. Designing built-ins is an art that takes contextual imperfections into account and makes dealing with them as easy as possible. A common way of handling these points of intersection […]

The post Scribing, Part Two: Making Cabinets Fit Seamlessly into Irregular Surroundings appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Registration Now Open – Build a Fore Plane Class

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 6:00am

You can now register for the “Build a Traditionally Styled Fore Plane” class via this link.

Note: Registering for the class or the waiting list is free – they won’t ask you for a credit card to register. After the dust settles, Jim McConnell will invoice the six attendees.

If the six slots are filled, please consider signing up for the waiting list. That way, if someone is unable to make it, Jim will have a list of other interested parties – and we’ll know that if the wait list is robust, it might be good to offer the same class again at a later date.

— Megan Fitzpatrick

Categories: Hand Tools

Check out the excellent use of a Japanese saw in the background....

Giant Cypress - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 3:18am


Check out the excellent use of a Japanese saw in the background. I can only imagine what the other guy is hammering.

drawer glued up.......

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:25am
Got the first drawer glued up and maybe tomorrow I'll be fitting the bottom on or in it. That depends upon how my spatial thinking is working at the time. I used hide glue on the drawer and the temps are cooperating. It's been raining all day but it is a bit on the warm side for this time of the year. It hit 51°F (10.5°C) today and the rest of week is looking to have mild temps in the 40's. Spring isn't too far away now. I have been hearing the birds singing every time I went outside today. That is another good sign for an early spring.

found my braces
I was very disappointed that the Lee Valley brace adapter is toast. It fits in all 6 of the braces I have but none of the hex bits will fit in it.

nice piece of chrome
pretty looking but useless
It is too light weight to repurpose as a paperweight. I'll email LV on this on monday and see what the solution is.

metric ball driver
I thought that since this was metric, the shank was metric too. It isn't (it's a 1/4") and it doesn't fit either.

hex driver fits
Not exactly what I was looking for here but in the interim it will do. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that LV can fix this.

hex adapter from LV fits
the phillips driver that came with the screwdriver
I wasn't sure that LV would have an adapter for this since it is a Craftsman. I measured the shaft of the phillips and it was 7mm. LV sells a 7mm adapter and it fits this perfectly.

drawer glued up
I used clamps on this to draw up the tails and pin tight. I had to fuss with the clamps for a bit to get the drawer square. With a square it looked good but the diagonals were off an 1/8".

diagonals re best
Charles Hayward advises not to use a square to check a carcass. Diagonals aren't influenced by bows and dips in the carcass. Both diagonals are dead nuts on.

front internal corner
the other front corner
I am now convinced that my gappy corners were caused by me moving the knife wall when I chopped the waste. I have done 4-5 dovetails now being careful not to move my knife walls and the results are better.

shined it a bit more
used this wheel
Had no problems with this wheel working. I couldn't stall this one no matter how hard I tried. Both wheels have the same buffing compound on them as I don't think I'll be using two different rouges.

this wheel stalls the motor, why?
I don't understand why one wheel buffs away and the other one will stall. It is the same motor and shaft driving both wheels.

found the problem
This nut was loose. Not fall off loose but a few threads shy of being tight. I tightened it and tried to stall the buffer again.

working now
I couldn't stall the motor after I tightened the nut on the shaft. It looks like I don't have a HF piece of crappola. I know nothing about buffing wheels but I saw a wider one at HF when I bought this. Makes sense to me that a wider wheel would probably buff a wide lever cap better than this thin one does?

thought I had only made one mistake
the first mistake
I sawed the back to width and since I had the front there too, I sawed it to the same width. Except the front did not have to be ripped to the same width as the back. I found both mistakes when I was starting to mark the baselines with my knife.

my second mistake is the pencil line is toast
I cut further down then I should have.

I used the drawer slip to mark the pencil line
but the wrong way
If I make a new back I still have the tails being over cut. Everyone of them is over cut by a 1/4". Using them may make the drawer weaker not to mention it will look like crap.

stopped at home depot
I had to go to BJ's warehouse to get my coffee k-cups but it wasn't open yet so I killed 20 minutes wandering around HD. I went looking for the rem oil again but came up dry on that but I saw this. Bob just blogged about using this on his drill rehab so I grabbed a bottle to try. I like that it is biodegradable and won't make me glow in the dark.

2 points for Krud  Kutter to 1 point for Zep
 It's made by Rustoleum who makes the primer and topcoat paint I use.

new drawer stock
This is the board I bought saturday and I'll be using it to make a new drawer.

I'll make this one wider
I'll let this sticker for a day or two,

fitting the first drawer slip
back end fitted around the back
gluing them in with hide glue
1/4" brass set up bar
Used this to keep the front aligned while I put on the clamps.

used one at the back too
slips glued and clamped
holder prototyping
put it here
or underneath the drawer
drilled some pilot holes
road tested my new hex adapter
sweet action - better then using a drill
this is out
In order for this work I will have to hang it down fairly low so I can take it out and put it back.

this is the winning spot
making dadoes
routed to depth
made a notch for the back brace
glued up
I think I may promote this from prototype to user status. I'll make the final decision on that tomorrow.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Did you know that the Five Kingdoms of Living Things are Animals, Fungi, Monera, Plants, and  Protists?

Blowing Past 800

The Barn on White Run - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 5:51pm

Returning from the regular Bible Study earlier this evening and reviewing the upcoming topics for the blog (I rarely do any work on Sunday, and generally aim for a couple dozen posts in the bullpen in varying states of development) I noticed that the blog had exceeded 800 posts last week without my even noticing.  I guess I must have a lot of verbal effluent in me.

I used to host a regular monthly luncheon for think tank mavens and opinion columnists trying to influence the shenanigans in Mordor, and at one of these off-the-record soirees a columnist wailed about “writer’s block” and the impossibility of having to grind out 300-400 “interesting” words twice a week.  I was unconvinced of the problem, and for the next year as an exercise I wrote that output just to show him it was not that tough.  It really wasn’t.

Admittedly, I was assisted by the fact that was the year the nation’s Commander in Heat was hound-dogging his way through the intern pool and eventually committed perjury to escape accountability, with his political adversaries tripping over themselves like clowns.  So, the 100 short essays almost wrote themselves.

I’m hoping that blogging continues the same easy path.  If I could get the time to easily be at the laptop, I would probably post every day.  When I don’t it just means that I am fully occupied with something, somewhere, or someone else.

Nostalgic Chairmaking: 40 years

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 5:05pm

 

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about my start in woodworking. Forty years ago I made my first “real” pieces of furniture; ladderback chairs from John (Jennie) Alexander’s Make a Chair from a Tree. The book came out in 1978, I remember when I first opened that package. The chairs I made then, from that book, would really make me cringe now – but that’s not the point. (thankfully, I have no idea where those chairs are, but I have this drawing of one saved in an old sketchbook. That chair was made before I met Alexander and Drew Langsner in 1980.)

For years, I made these chairs, and then Windsors – before I made any oak furniture. Then once I started on the oak joined furniture, those chairs sort of fell by the wayside. I made a couple kid-sized JA-style chairs when my children were small, but that was it.

Otherwise, large oak carved chairs or turned (also large) chairs – all that 17th-century stuff. We saw one of my wainscot chairs displayed in the Hingham Massachusetts Public Library the other day. I made it based on an original made in Hingham in the 17th century.

But I’ve been planning for a while to “re-learn” how to make JA ladderbacks. These chairs are more demanding than my wainscot chairs – the tolerances are much tighter, less forgiving. I made a couple attempts recently that I wasn’t happy enough with to finish – so today I took the day off from joinery and worked on one of these chairs. First thing I did was to review Jennie’s DVD about making the chair. If you are interested in these chairs, I highly recommend that video. http://www.greenwoodworking.com/MACFATVideo 

(yes, Jennie & Lost Art Press are working towards a new edition of the book – but get the video in the meantime. It covers every detail of making this chair.)

The part I had to re-learn is how to orient the bent rear posts while boring the mortises. That’s what I went to the video for; the rest I still had. Included with the video are drawings for a couple helpful jigs to aid in those tricky bits. This morning I made several of those jigs – but didn’t photograph any of that. I didn’t get the camera out until I was boring mortises…

In this photo, I’m boring the mortises for the side rungs into the rear post. If you get this angle wrong, you might as well quit now. I forget now who came up with this horizontal boring method – but I learned it from Jennie & Drew Langsner. They worked together many summers teaching classes to make this chair. The photo is a bit cluttered (the bench is cluttered really) so it’s hard to see. But the bent rear post needs to be oriented carefully. But once you have it right, then it’s just a matter of keeping the bit extender level and square to the post. there’s a line level taped to the bit extender. Eyeball 90 degrees.

Alexander’s non-traditional assembly sequence is to make the side sections of the chair first. So after boring the rear & front posts for the side rungs, I shaved the tenons in the now-dried rungs. Mostly spokeshave work.

I bored several test holes with the same bit, to gauge the tenons’ size. Chamfer the end of the tenon, try to force it into the hole. Then shave it to just squeeze in there. No measurements.

Once the tenon starts in that hole, you get a burnished bit right at the end. That’s the guideline now. Shave down to it.

Yes, glue. I don’t often use it, but this is a case where I do. The chair would probably be fine without it, but it doesn’t hurt. Belt & suspenders. Knocking the side rungs into the rear post.

Make sure things line up, and the front post is not upside-down.

Then bang it together. Listen for the sound to change when the joints are all the way in.

Then time to bore the front & rear mortises. This little angle-jig has the unpleasant name of “potty seat” – I wish there was another name for it. But there’s a level down on the inside cutout – so I tilt the chair section back & forth until that reads level. Then bore it.

 

It’s hard to see from this angle, but that chair section is tilted away from me, creating the proper angle between the side and rear rungs.

Then re-set for the front mortises.

I was running out of daylight – and any other task, I’d just leave it til tomorrow. But with glue, and the wet/dry joints, I wanted to get this whole frame together this afternoon. Here I’m knocking the rear rungs in place. That’s a glue-spreader (oak shaving) in the front mortise.

Got it.

Expect to hear a lot more from me this year about making these chairs; their relationship to historical chairs, and also about the people who taught me to make them. It’s been a heck of a trip these past 40 years.

Make Your Own ‘Drawing Bow’

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 11:13am

If you design furniture or work a lot with curved parts, it’s difficult to function without a “drawing bow.” This simple jig – a stick and a string – allows you to lay out precise and large curves with only two hands. Before I could afford a commercial one (Lee Valley Tools makes an excellent one that I recommended in my 2017 Anarchist’s Gift Guide), I made my own. While […]

The post Make Your Own ‘Drawing Bow’ appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Warped Panels

360 WoodWorking - Sun, 02/11/2018 - 8:55am
Warped Panels

I don’t know of many woodworkers who set out to have their glued-up panels warp. Warped panels happen to most of us at one time or another. It is reason to question your procedure and if you did something not quite right. Were your pieces dry? Did you allow the wood to reach equilibrium in your shop before milling? Did the humidity in your shop change between the time you glued your panels to when you got back to working them?

Continue reading Warped Panels at 360 WoodWorking.

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