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How to Cut a Rock-Solid T-Bridle Joint

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 6:10am

One of the first joints I learned to cut during my City & Guilds of London training was the T-bridle, which we used for the leg-to-rail connection on a modern end table, one of the projects that made up the curriculum. Like other variants of the bridle joint, this one is often used for table bases and benches. You can see an especially elegant example of this joint here. The T-bridle […]

The post How to Cut a Rock-Solid T-Bridle Joint appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

yo-yo weather.........

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:17am
The weather has been a little screwy lately. It has been unseasonably warm but one day last week had dipped down into the 40's overnight. We also had one day where it rained all day like a cow letting go on a flat rock. That day sucked because I got soaked going into work. We still haven't had the first frost of the year and tonight it is forecasted to rain again with high winds > 50MPH. Not that I'm complaining because everyday that is warm is one less day I have to pay for heat.

quiet time work
I worked on fitting the lid and cleared most of the other crappola off the bench.

two strops?
I am going to make at least two strops out this. One more for me that is longer than the ones I have now and one for Miles. The strops I have now are about 8" long and 3" wide. I think the width is ok but the length is too short. I can get 3 strops from this piece of leather each one 3" wide by 12" long.

walnut banding is solid
The glue appears to be ok with holding the walnut. There aren't any gaps anywhere that I can see. I am not depending upon the walnut to hold the lid on. The banding is to hide the strips I glued on the bottom of the lid.

very snug fit
The lid goes on this way and won't fit when I flip it 180. It probably would if I thumped it but I didn't want to chance popping the banding off.

marked the connection
I marked the lid  and bottom for the best fit before I glued the walnut on. It fits this way but not 180.

chisel action
I used the chisel as a scraper and went around the inside of the lid. I concentrated on getting any glue residue off first and checked the fit. It fit on the numbers and when I flipped it 180. It was a wee bit snug, but it fit.

tight on the left and some daylight on the right
I scraped the inside of the walnut until I saw daylight all around. I then sanded the top outside rim of the box with 120 grit. That did two things for me - first it loosened the fit of the walnut and it closed up the toes on the miters. I finally got the lid to fit both ways, equally well.

rounded over the lid banding
I sanded this corner again. The toes of the miter are closed at the top and open at the middle. I sanded coming from both sides until the miter closed up.

rounded over the top of the lid
Made a decision regarding this box. Taking the lid off is too much to do one handed. It is too wide to easily and comfortably be removed one handed. It needs a knob or a handle to do that. I won't be using this box to keep the 140 in. I'll have to make a 3rd 140 box.

first knob choice
Don't like it and I won't be using it. I thought of making a base or a pad for it but I don't think even that will help this look.

3 more knob choices
The metal knobs are toast but the ring pull I kind of like. I think that would look ok with a base for it. I think a base is needed to beef this up because the lid is only a piece of 1/8" plywood. Without a base behind any kind of a knob or handle, the lid might flex.

found some feet
I had forgotten that I had these. Since it isn't going to be the 140 box anymore, I'll use them on this. I can give this as a xmas present with a gift certificate in it. Or stuffed with some of my daughter's favorite candy.

going to make a walnut handle
flushed
Worked on flushing this while I thought of what I wanted to make for a handle.

#8 hollow
I squared up the walnut stick and used the #8 to knock off the corners. I wasn't trying to make it round but just come up with a shape that was inbetween round and square.


fixing the Disston 6" square
I didn't like the look of the walnut handle so I worked on this square while I thought of something else. The light area on the bottom square isn't daylight. It is what I filed to bring the inside of it square. The outside was dead nuts and didn't need any help.

done
It took a few extra cha-cha dance steps but it is square now. I did 3 checks for square. The first was with the 6" engineer's square, second was drawing double lines on the plywood, and third was checking the square edge on the plywood. All three passed and I did one more final check with the 6" engineer's square. I have a 15" square coming and I should have that next week. That will complete it for these style of squares for Miles's toolbox. I still want to get a 4" sliding square and I might have to bite the bullet and buy a Starrett.

half laps on the legs done
Now that the leg half laps were done, I flipped this over and marked the brace for it's half laps.

feet leveling
Because I planed one shoulder on one leg more than the other, the angle between the legs changed. I sawed the legs at the original bevel angle but since the legs aren't even, the horizontal brace isn't parallel to them neither. Once the glue has set on the brace, I'll saw and plane flush the overhanging parts. The ugly looking gap will be history come tomorrow.

I had to plane one leg square, the other one was sawn square
here you can see the tilt in it
According to what I read, this won't effect the reading you get. You take one reading this way and mark where the plumb bob hangs, flip it 180 and repeat. The plumb will be between the two lines. You just have to look at where the plumb bob is hanging in relation to your plumb line to see which side is high/low.

I wanted parallel
I drew a line on the bench and put the legs on it and adjusted it until the brace measured the same from that line to the brace on the outside of both legs. Once I had that I marked the legs and sawed them off. I didn't go nutso on this, I was shooting for an eyeball close look and I got that.

had to make a pit stop
I dropped this off the bench right on the point. This is the backside of the knife after I restored it. I still had a bit more to go but I was very surprised by how easily I did it. This was my first experience sharpening a japanese anything.

got my point back
I tried it out and it felt as sharp as when I first got it.

decided to sharpen the iron on my new blockplane
This iron has been hand sharpened and it is out of square. I can tell it is has been sharpened by hand because the bevel is rounded and it is also uneven. First batter is grinding a new bevel and squaring it.

10 strokes on the 80 grit runway
The stripe down by the heel is what I just did. I have a long ways to go before I get to the toe.

got a hump
I wasn't going to do the back because it looked like it had been done already. Took me about 20 minutes to get rid of it.

adjuster knobs
The one in my fingers is the LN knob and the one in the back is a replacement one. It has a bearing where the ring is on the LN one. That makes for zero backlash and a silky smooth adjustment on moving the iron in or out. It is made by an  Australian  and he makes them for the LN 102 and 103 small block planes too. I am going to get one for the LN 60 1/2 and for the 102.

done
Silky smooth, effortlessly made wispy shavings. This is a good addition to the herd and it will get well used by me. I had started lapping and cleaning up the cheeks and sole by stopped. There is some pitting on the right cheek and the sole that wasn't lapping out with 220. I didn't feel like starting with 80 and working up. For now it has been done with 220 and 320 followed by some Autosol. I will do it eventually because I don't like seeing the pits. But for now she is ready to go back to work.

I'll keep it in here for now
Until I get around to rearranging the plane storage under my bench, this will have to live here for now.

replacements for the hasp
The left one isn't brass but a shiny white metal color. If it was brass I wouldn't be putting the black one on.

done
I like this but I am not in love with the cheap look and feel of it. It works well for lifting the lid and the curl is below the top so it won't interfere with crap being piled on the lid. But I will be looking for a replacement that isn't a stamped, cheap piece of crappola like this.


Update: Found a solid brass one from House of Antique Hardware and I almost skipped on it. S/H was $3 less than the sash lift.

the back for the plumbline stick
There is a teeny bit of twist on the far end that I'll have to remove. The author said that this should be twist free. I'll do that tomorrow because I fell off the wagon with taking my arthritis  pills again. My fingers are aching on my right hand and this is a good place to stop. I'll get the stick done tomorrow.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia?
answer - a fear of the number 666

The Melbourne Fair 2017

Pegs and 'Tails - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:33pm
The Melbourne Fair Antique, 20th Century, Art Deco, Vintage 23rd to 26th November Caulfield Racecourse Indoor Concourse Space Gate 23, Station Street Caulfield East, Victoria Opening Night 23rd November 6-9pm, 24th November 11am-6pm, 25th November 10am-6pm, 26th November 10am-5pm If … Continue reading
Categories: Hand Tools

Additional Tip Shapes for Dividers

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 10/29/2017 - 4:56pm

final_divider_IMG_9194

We’ve just posted a new video at Crucible Tool’s blog on how to create two additional (and useful) tip shapes for your dividers. One tip is designed specifically for scribing arcs. The other is for cutting inlay or recesses.

While we show these tips on our Improved Pattern Dividers, they can be created on any pair of dividers.

Also in the short video, Raney demonstrates a down-and-dirty way to harden and temper the tips with a torch.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Crucible Tool, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

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